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History Museum

Mary Rose Museum

Recomendado por 15 habitantes locales
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Home of the Mary Rose, flagship of Henry VIII which sank off the South Coast of England in 1545, and now lives in a state-of-the-art Museum in Portsmouth
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Consejos de residentes locales

Jonty And Denise
Jonty And Denise
December 16, 2019
Outstanding museum revealing the hull and the contents of King Henry VIII ship that was sunk between Portsmouth and the Isle of Wight. This is a museum like no other, it is incredible and not to be missed!
Julia
Julia
November 25, 2019
A must for history lovers!
Wendy
Wendy
September 26, 2019
A must see for all history lovers.
Judie
Judie
September 24, 2019
Absolutely a ‘must see’ - 25 minutes drive to see the famous ‘Mary Rose’
Neil
Neil
July 25, 2019
Exceptional experience.

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Establishment
“Welcome on board HMS Warrior 1860, Britain’s first iron-hulled, armoured battleship. Launched in 1860, at a time of empire and Britain’s dominance in trade and industry, Warrior was the pride of Queen Victoria’s fleet. Powered by steam and sail, she was the largest, fastest and most powerful warship of her day and had a lasting influence on naval architecture and design. Work and life on board reflected both the changes the Royal Navy experienced as it evolved into a professional service and shifts in Victorian society. Built to counter the latest French battleship, Warrior was, in her time, the ultimate deterrent. Yet by igniting a new era in naval technology, she soon became outdated. After 22 years’ service, Warrior’s hull was to be used as a depot, floating school and an oil jetty. Painstakingly restored in Hartlepool and back home in Portsmouth since 1987, Warrior is a unique survivor of the once formidable Victorian Black Battlefleet and now serves as a museum ship, visitor attraction, popular private hire venue and more. Open all year round*, the Captain and crew invite you to come on board and explore this almighty Victorian battleship for yourself. The Ship’s company are also on hand to answer any questions you may have”
  • Recomendado por 7 habitantes locales
Establishment
“Portsmouth Guildhall is a multi-use venue in the centre of Portsmouth, UK, located on a pedestrian square close to the Portsmouth and Southsea railway station. Constructed in 1890 and originally used by the local council, the building was known as Portsmouth Town Hall until 1926. It was heavily damaged by bombing during the Second World War and largely rebuilt during the 1950s. Today it operates as a concert, wedding and conference venue. The building was designed in the neo-classical style by architect William Hill, who had previously designed the visually similar Bolton Town Hall. Local architect Charles Bevis, in partnership with Hill, directed the construction. Hill died before the building was completed and Bevis added to the design. When completed in 1890, the building became the civic town hall. On 21 April 1926 Portsmouth was raised to the status of a city and the town hall was simultaneously renamed the Guildhall. On 10 January 1941, during the Second World War, it was hit by enemy incendiary bombs. The resultant fire gutted the building, completely destroying the interior and roof. Just the outer walls and tower remained standing, and those were fire-damaged. The Guildhall was rebuilt after the war at a cost of £1.5 million, using war compensation funds. The interior was altered from the original and the external style is missing much of its original detail, especially the dome above the clock and the finials atop the balustrades around the roof. Elizabeth II re-opened the building in a ceremony on 8 June 1959. There are five bells in its bell tower, collectively nicknamed The Pompey Chimes, as they inspired the football chant of the same name. The largest of the five bells, Victoria is named after Queen Victoria and is inscribed with her name, and chimes on the hour. The four quarter bells chime at 15, 30 and 45 minutes past the hour and play the Westminster Quarters, just before Victoria tolls on the hour. The Pompey Chimes fell silent in 2003 when the bell tower was found to be in need of restoration from the corrosive nature of sea salt in the Portsmouth air. The work was carried out by Smith of Derby Group, the restoration project finishing in time for Queen Elizabeth's visit to Portsmouth in 2009 to mark the 65th anniversary of the D-Day landings. The four quarter bells were to have been officially named Nelson, Victory, John Pounds and Harry Redknapp in a 2008 public poll by Portsmouth City Council in 2008. The official naming was stalled due to the high popularity of internet votes for Harry Redknapp's name from unregistered anonymous voters. Redknapp, the former Portsmouth Football Club manager had suddenly departed the club for Tottenham Hotspur F.C. shortly before bell name voting commenced, which had left a wide range of emotions among many Portsmouth Football Club fans and city residents. Foul play, possibly from rival football supporters was suspected by Portsmouth City Council, who had organised the vote, and the four quarter bells have remained unnamed.”
  • Recomendado por 6 habitantes locales
History Museum
“Free to walk around has champagne bar there every Friday in the summer months and only 10 min walk from our holiday home”
  • Recomendado por 15 habitantes locales
Teatro
“Lots of good theatre productions and situated on the main social hub of Portsmouth, Albert Road. lots of bars for a pre drink before a show or after hours. ”
  • Recomendado por 17 habitantes locales
Aquarium
“Aquarium not as good as the London one but ok if you need something to entertain children for an hour or 2”
  • Recomendado por 10 habitantes locales
Ubicación
Portsmouth, PO1 3PY
Teléfono023 9281 2931
Sitio webmaryrose.org
Wifi
Free
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