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Guidebook for Lisboa

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Guidebook for Lisboa

Food Scene
Located a few minutes from the apartment, this café with terrace invites you to sample a menu with flavors from around the world but especially from the Mediterranean. It welcomes tourists who arrive here attracted by the striking facade of the Viúva Lamego store next door, but also local residents for a coffee break or brunch, always with a dish and juice of the day.
The Coffee of Joanas
Located a few minutes from the apartment, this café with terrace invites you to sample a menu with flavors from around the world but especially from the Mediterranean. It welcomes tourists who arrive here attracted by the striking facade of the Viúva Lamego store next door, but also local residents for a coffee break or brunch, always with a dish and juice of the day.
The best Pasteis de Nata in Lisbon! A small space with an Art Nouveau facade facing Camões Square, that was once part of a butter shop, has reopened as a "custard tarts factory." The tarts are continuously made in front of you throughout the day, and you may take a few to enjoy at home or have them at the counter. It opens every day, and only closes at midnight.
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Manteigaria
2 Rua do Loreto
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The best Pasteis de Nata in Lisbon! A small space with an Art Nouveau facade facing Camões Square, that was once part of a butter shop, has reopened as a "custard tarts factory." The tarts are continuously made in front of you throughout the day, and you may take a few to enjoy at home or have them at the counter. It opens every day, and only closes at midnight.
The official name is "Antiga Confeitaria de Belém" ("Belem's Old confectionery") but everyone simply calls it "Pasteis de Belém" ("Belém Pastries"). Its pastries have become famous around the country and even the world, known internationally as "Portuguese custard tarts" or "pastéis de nata." "Pastel de Nata" is the name of the very same tart when not made at this shop, and those from here are not only the originals but also the best, made from a secret recipe since 1837. They come recommended in every guidebook, which explains the long lines outside the door. You may grab some to go, but also try them oven-warm in the beautifully tiled rooms inside.
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Pastéis de Belém
84-92 R. de Belém
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The official name is "Antiga Confeitaria de Belém" ("Belem's Old confectionery") but everyone simply calls it "Pasteis de Belém" ("Belém Pastries"). Its pastries have become famous around the country and even the world, known internationally as "Portuguese custard tarts" or "pastéis de nata." "Pastel de Nata" is the name of the very same tart when not made at this shop, and those from here are not only the originals but also the best, made from a secret recipe since 1837. They come recommended in every guidebook, which explains the long lines outside the door. You may grab some to go, but also try them oven-warm in the beautifully tiled rooms inside.
This is Lisbon's most famous historic café. It opened in 1905 and maintains a beautiful Art Deco interior made up of wood, modernist paintings, mirrors and marble, plus a much-photographed statue of poet Fernando Pessoa outside. No visit to Lisbon is complete without photographing the poet, so tourists usually take over most of the outdoor seating. It stays open until late, and although the coffee no longer comes exclusively from Brazil, it's as good as ever.
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Cafe A Brasileira
120 R. Garrett
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This is Lisbon's most famous historic café. It opened in 1905 and maintains a beautiful Art Deco interior made up of wood, modernist paintings, mirrors and marble, plus a much-photographed statue of poet Fernando Pessoa outside. No visit to Lisbon is complete without photographing the poet, so tourists usually take over most of the outdoor seating. It stays open until late, and although the coffee no longer comes exclusively from Brazil, it's as good as ever.
It's almost two centuries old (it was founded in 1829) but holds on to its reputation as one of Lisbon's best cafés and pastry shops (it was the official confectioner of the royal family and has won international prizes in Vienna, Paris, and the United States). It's particularly famous for its Christmas cake ("Bolo Rei" or "King Cake"), a national tradition that started when the original owner brought a recipe from Paris in 1850. At any other time of the year this is also a safe bet to try dozens of traditional Portuguese pastries or to pick up a birthday cake, but another reason for a visit is the beautiful interior.
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Confeitaria Nacional
18B Praça da Figueira
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It's almost two centuries old (it was founded in 1829) but holds on to its reputation as one of Lisbon's best cafés and pastry shops (it was the official confectioner of the royal family and has won international prizes in Vienna, Paris, and the United States). It's particularly famous for its Christmas cake ("Bolo Rei" or "King Cake"), a national tradition that started when the original owner brought a recipe from Paris in 1850. At any other time of the year this is also a safe bet to try dozens of traditional Portuguese pastries or to pick up a birthday cake, but another reason for a visit is the beautiful interior.
Two Austrian friends opened this Vienna-inspired café in Chiado and it immediately became one of the hottest addresses for a drink and light meal, especially on Sunday morning brunch. One of the walls is covered with film posters while the rest of the décor is simple-contemporary. Daily specials are listed on a blackboard and there are different international periodicals available.
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Kaffeehaus
3 R. Anchieta
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Two Austrian friends opened this Vienna-inspired café in Chiado and it immediately became one of the hottest addresses for a drink and light meal, especially on Sunday morning brunch. One of the walls is covered with film posters while the rest of the décor is simple-contemporary. Daily specials are listed on a blackboard and there are different international periodicals available.
Known for its fresh seafood (mostly caught in the cold waters of the north of the Iberian peninsula), this is one of the most popular seafood restaurants in Lisbon. Open for half a century, it attracts diverse crowds through an authentic ambience and more reasonable prices that at other seafood restaurants in the city.
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Ramiro
nº1 - H Av. Alm. Reis
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Known for its fresh seafood (mostly caught in the cold waters of the north of the Iberian peninsula), this is one of the most popular seafood restaurants in Lisbon. Open for half a century, it attracts diverse crowds through an authentic ambience and more reasonable prices that at other seafood restaurants in the city.
Mercado da Ribeira (also known as Mercado 24 de Julho) is Lisbon's main food market since 1892, when it opened with an iron interior and a large oriental dome. In 2014 it was taken over by Time Out Lisboa magazine, whose management added stalls offering food and traditional local products. The traditional stalls selling fresh produce are found on the ground floor and are open from 6AM to 2PM. The food court, with canteen-style communal tables, opened in May of 2014 and has become a major food destination. It’s on the western side of the building on the ground floor, and opens every day from 10AM to midnight from Sunday to Wednesday and from 10AM to 2AM from Thursday to Saturday.
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Mercado da Ribeira
s/n Av. 24 de Julho
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Mercado da Ribeira (also known as Mercado 24 de Julho) is Lisbon's main food market since 1892, when it opened with an iron interior and a large oriental dome. In 2014 it was taken over by Time Out Lisboa magazine, whose management added stalls offering food and traditional local products. The traditional stalls selling fresh produce are found on the ground floor and are open from 6AM to 2PM. The food court, with canteen-style communal tables, opened in May of 2014 and has become a major food destination. It’s on the western side of the building on the ground floor, and opens every day from 10AM to midnight from Sunday to Wednesday and from 10AM to 2AM from Thursday to Saturday.
Shopping
Turn back time and grab a classic Portuguese product as a gift. Nostalgic locals, or simply those with good taste, come here for the same soaps and gourmet products that their grandmothers used to buy, while tourists are fascinated by the retro packagings. "Genuine" is the word to describe everything you see at the original shop in Chiado and at a second space in Largo do Intendente, which is more spacious and includes homeware.
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A Vida Portuguesa
23 Largo do Intendente Pina Manique
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Turn back time and grab a classic Portuguese product as a gift. Nostalgic locals, or simply those with good taste, come here for the same soaps and gourmet products that their grandmothers used to buy, while tourists are fascinated by the retro packagings. "Genuine" is the word to describe everything you see at the original shop in Chiado and at a second space in Largo do Intendente, which is more spacious and includes homeware.
Turn back time and grab a classic Portuguese product as a gift. Nostalgic locals, or simply those with good taste, come here for the same soaps and gourmet products that their grandmothers used to buy, while tourists are fascinated by the retro packagings. "Genuine" is the word to describe everything you see at the original shop in Chiado and at a second space in Largo do Intendente, which is more spacious and includes homeware.
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A Vida Portuguesa
11 R. Anchieta
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Turn back time and grab a classic Portuguese product as a gift. Nostalgic locals, or simply those with good taste, come here for the same soaps and gourmet products that their grandmothers used to buy, while tourists are fascinated by the retro packagings. "Genuine" is the word to describe everything you see at the original shop in Chiado and at a second space in Largo do Intendente, which is more spacious and includes homeware.
Tourists love this old-fashioned shop that has been offering cans of fish since the 1930s. The attraction is the precious retro packaging and the charm of the interior, looking just like it did eight decades ago, with a mosaic stone floor and a wooden cash register.
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Conserveira de Lisboa
34 Rua dos Bacalhoeiros
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Tourists love this old-fashioned shop that has been offering cans of fish since the 1930s. The attraction is the precious retro packaging and the charm of the interior, looking just like it did eight decades ago, with a mosaic stone floor and a wooden cash register.
Founded by two French brothers in 1732, this is Lisbon's, Portugal's, and the world's oldest bookshop, as confirmed by a certificate from the Guinness Book of World Records. It has a small selection of books in English (including translations of Portuguese classics and contemporary bestsellers), guidebooks, and a section with international magazines.
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Bertrand
73 R. Garrett
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Founded by two French brothers in 1732, this is Lisbon's, Portugal's, and the world's oldest bookshop, as confirmed by a certificate from the Guinness Book of World Records. It has a small selection of books in English (including translations of Portuguese classics and contemporary bestsellers), guidebooks, and a section with international magazines.
When it celebrated its 125th anniversary on November 22nd, 2011, it was reported that this was Europe’s oldest barber shop. It’s certainly the oldest in Portugal, but it does have competition for the European title in London. “Truefitt & Hill” claims to be in business since 1805, but it’s had different locations and concepts over time. Lisbon’s “Barbearia Campos” has been on the same spot for all its years, and still maintains museum-worthy furnishings and classic service. It also preserves an old “Cabelleireiro” sign (meaning “hairdresser”) with the old Portuguese spelling (it now only has one “L”).
Campos
4 Largo do Chiado
When it celebrated its 125th anniversary on November 22nd, 2011, it was reported that this was Europe’s oldest barber shop. It’s certainly the oldest in Portugal, but it does have competition for the European title in London. “Truefitt & Hill” claims to be in business since 1805, but it’s had different locations and concepts over time. Lisbon’s “Barbearia Campos” has been on the same spot for all its years, and still maintains museum-worthy furnishings and classic service. It also preserves an old “Cabelleireiro” sign (meaning “hairdresser”) with the old Portuguese spelling (it now only has one “L”).
Lisbon's flea market is a destination for bargains and treasure hunting every Saturday and Tuesday mornings. It's located by the National Pantheon and by one of the city's most beautiful tiled facades, and has more junk than real treasures, but it can be fun finding some oddities in between it all. Because "ladra" means thief, guidebooks often translate its name as "the thieves' market," but the name most likely derived from "ladro," a bug usually found among antiques at this type of markets. Only on Tuesdays and Saturdays mornings.
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Mercado de Santa Clara
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Lisbon's flea market is a destination for bargains and treasure hunting every Saturday and Tuesday mornings. It's located by the National Pantheon and by one of the city's most beautiful tiled facades, and has more junk than real treasures, but it can be fun finding some oddities in between it all. Because "ladra" means thief, guidebooks often translate its name as "the thieves' market," but the name most likely derived from "ladro," a bug usually found among antiques at this type of markets. Only on Tuesdays and Saturdays mornings.
Sightseeing
This 16th-century monastery is Lisbon's must-see marvel, flashing back to the days of the Age of Discovery, when the spices of the East paid for the impressive architecture that has given it the status of World Heritage Site. Riches from all over the world poured into Lisbon thanks to Vasco da Gama's discovery of the maritime route to India, and the explorer's tomb is found in the church, a space filled with carvings of sea motifs. Another tomb is that of poet Luís de Camões. Coral, sea monsters and ropes are also represented in the even more magnificent cloisters, which are unlike any other in the world.
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Monasterio de los Jerónimos de Belém
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This 16th-century monastery is Lisbon's must-see marvel, flashing back to the days of the Age of Discovery, when the spices of the East paid for the impressive architecture that has given it the status of World Heritage Site. Riches from all over the world poured into Lisbon thanks to Vasco da Gama's discovery of the maritime route to India, and the explorer's tomb is found in the church, a space filled with carvings of sea motifs. Another tomb is that of poet Luís de Camões. Coral, sea monsters and ropes are also represented in the even more magnificent cloisters, which are unlike any other in the world.
Lisbon's most famous landmark stands in the middle of the Tagus River as it reaches the Atlantic, where it once protected the city in the 1500s. Built in 1515, the Belem Tower is a beautiful fortress that also served as the departure point for many of the voyages of discovery, and due to its architecture and historical significance it has been declared a World Heritage Site. The highlight of a visit is admiring the façade facing the river and the views from its loggias and windows. You'll see stonework relating to the Age of Discovery, including Our Lady of Safe Homecoming who was believed to protect sailors at sea.
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Torre de Belém
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Lisbon's most famous landmark stands in the middle of the Tagus River as it reaches the Atlantic, where it once protected the city in the 1500s. Built in 1515, the Belem Tower is a beautiful fortress that also served as the departure point for many of the voyages of discovery, and due to its architecture and historical significance it has been declared a World Heritage Site. The highlight of a visit is admiring the façade facing the river and the views from its loggias and windows. You'll see stonework relating to the Age of Discovery, including Our Lady of Safe Homecoming who was believed to protect sailors at sea.
Over a millennium-old and still Lisbon's most splendid sight: Spectacularly sited on the city's tallest hill, St. George's Castle offers a breathtaking view over Lisbon. It was first built in the 6th century, and was occupied by the Romans and Visigoths before it became a Moorish royal residence. Portugal's first king captured it in 1147 and it was named after England's patron saint following the Anglo-Portuguese alliance. In one of its rooms (where Vasco da Gama was welcomed after returning from India) is a collection of archaeological finds, while one of the towers holds a periscope projecting images from around the city.
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Castillo de San Jorge de Lisboa
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Over a millennium-old and still Lisbon's most splendid sight: Spectacularly sited on the city's tallest hill, St. George's Castle offers a breathtaking view over Lisbon. It was first built in the 6th century, and was occupied by the Romans and Visigoths before it became a Moorish royal residence. Portugal's first king captured it in 1147 and it was named after England's patron saint following the Anglo-Portuguese alliance. In one of its rooms (where Vasco da Gama was welcomed after returning from India) is a collection of archaeological finds, while one of the towers holds a periscope projecting images from around the city.
All of Lisbon's lookout points are romantic, but none more than this one, looking over all of downtown towards the castle and the river. It's a landscaped terrace with busts of historical figures, a fountain, and kiosk cafés from where you may sit and admire the beauty of the city. Going up and down the hill next to the terrace is the Gloria funicular, and across the street is the bar of the Port Wine Institute, where you may sample all types of Portugal's famous drink.
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Jardín de São Pedro de Alcântara
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All of Lisbon's lookout points are romantic, but none more than this one, looking over all of downtown towards the castle and the river. It's a landscaped terrace with busts of historical figures, a fountain, and kiosk cafés from where you may sit and admire the beauty of the city. Going up and down the hill next to the terrace is the Gloria funicular, and across the street is the bar of the Port Wine Institute, where you may sample all types of Portugal's famous drink.
The postcard-perfect panoramic views from this “balcony” ("the gateway of the sun") over Alfama go from the St. Vincent Monastery to the National Pantheon and the Church of St. Stephen. It's a must-photograph spot for any tourist, who ends up staying for a drink at the tables next to a kiosk, or at the Portas do Sol café below. At the center, facing the Decorative Arts Museum, is a statue of St. Vincent (Lisbon’s patron saint), holding the symbols of the city - a boat with two ravens. This is where you have the best sunrise views in town, and is the ideal starting point for a walk through the streets of Alfama.
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Miradouro das Portas do Sol
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The postcard-perfect panoramic views from this “balcony” ("the gateway of the sun") over Alfama go from the St. Vincent Monastery to the National Pantheon and the Church of St. Stephen. It's a must-photograph spot for any tourist, who ends up staying for a drink at the tables next to a kiosk, or at the Portas do Sol café below. At the center, facing the Decorative Arts Museum, is a statue of St. Vincent (Lisbon’s patron saint), holding the symbols of the city - a boat with two ravens. This is where you have the best sunrise views in town, and is the ideal starting point for a walk through the streets of Alfama.
This is one of the most romantic spots in Lisbon. It's a landscaped terrace next to a small church of the same name, offering a beautiful panoramic view of the city's oldest district, Alfama. The dome of the National Pantheon, Santo Estêvão Church and São Miguel Church stand out among the sea of rooftops below, while the vines that climb up the pergola provide shade on the upper level. The lower terrace allows you to stay in the sun by a reflecting pool. At the center of the bougainvillea garden is a bust of Lisbon historian Júlio de Castilho, and behind it are two tile panels illustrating St. George's Castle being taken over from the Moors in 1147, and the other showing Comércio Square.
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Mirador de Santa Lucía
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This is one of the most romantic spots in Lisbon. It's a landscaped terrace next to a small church of the same name, offering a beautiful panoramic view of the city's oldest district, Alfama. The dome of the National Pantheon, Santo Estêvão Church and São Miguel Church stand out among the sea of rooftops below, while the vines that climb up the pergola provide shade on the upper level. The lower terrace allows you to stay in the sun by a reflecting pool. At the center of the bougainvillea garden is a bust of Lisbon historian Júlio de Castilho, and behind it are two tile panels illustrating St. George's Castle being taken over from the Moors in 1147, and the other showing Comércio Square.
This romantic pine-shaded terrace overlooking the city is a popular hangout for young groups, thanks to its kiosk café and fantastic views that go from the castle down to the river. Everyone calls it Miradouro da Graça, but the official name is Miradouro Sophia de Mello Breyner Andresen, a poet who died in 2004 and who spent many of her days admiring Lisbon from this spot. One of her poems can be read on a wall facing her bronze bust, which is seen looking out to the city. Standing behind it is an 18th-century church, Igreja da Graça.
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Miradouro da Graça
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This romantic pine-shaded terrace overlooking the city is a popular hangout for young groups, thanks to its kiosk café and fantastic views that go from the castle down to the river. Everyone calls it Miradouro da Graça, but the official name is Miradouro Sophia de Mello Breyner Andresen, a poet who died in 2004 and who spent many of her days admiring Lisbon from this spot. One of her poems can be read on a wall facing her bronze bust, which is seen looking out to the city. Standing behind it is an 18th-century church, Igreja da Graça.
It was once one of the city's biggest secrets, but it has been discovered by tour guides and young couples. It offers a panoramic view of Lisbon, which is also observed by a small image of the Virgin that gives the place its name ("Our Lady of the Mount"). Behind the image is a small chapel from the 1700s, which is almost always closed. According to an old legend, pregnant women who sat on the stone chair inside would have a problem-free childbirth. This is one of the highest points in the city, so several monuments, identified on a tile panel, can be seen from here. This spot is especially popular at sunset.
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Miradouro da Senhora do Monte
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It was once one of the city's biggest secrets, but it has been discovered by tour guides and young couples. It offers a panoramic view of Lisbon, which is also observed by a small image of the Virgin that gives the place its name ("Our Lady of the Mount"). Behind the image is a small chapel from the 1700s, which is almost always closed. According to an old legend, pregnant women who sat on the stone chair inside would have a problem-free childbirth. This is one of the highest points in the city, so several monuments, identified on a tile panel, can be seen from here. This spot is especially popular at sunset.
Inaugurated in 1902 as public transportion linking Baixa (downtown) and the Chiado district, this 45m-high (148 ft) elevator is one of Lisbon's main landmarks. It's one of the city's most visited and most photographed monuments, offering a breathtaking 360-degree view from the top. The neo-Gothic iron tower is embellished with ornamented designs, and covers two elegant wooden cabins carrying 20 passengers at a time. It was designed by Raul Mesnier du Ponsard, an engineer of French descent, who used the techniques and the materials in vogue in France at the time, as seen in the Eiffel Tower a few years earlier.
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Elevador de Santa Justa
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Inaugurated in 1902 as public transportion linking Baixa (downtown) and the Chiado district, this 45m-high (148 ft) elevator is one of Lisbon's main landmarks. It's one of the city's most visited and most photographed monuments, offering a breathtaking 360-degree view from the top. The neo-Gothic iron tower is embellished with ornamented designs, and covers two elegant wooden cabins carrying 20 passengers at a time. It was designed by Raul Mesnier du Ponsard, an engineer of French descent, who used the techniques and the materials in vogue in France at the time, as seen in the Eiffel Tower a few years earlier.
It's best known as "Rua Augusta Arch" but its main façade faces Praça do Comércio. It's a triumphal arch designed in 1775 as a gateway to the city, but the version seen today dates from a century later, 1875. Sculptures at the top represent Glory crowning Genius and Valor. Below them are images of national heroes Vasco da Gama, the Marquis of Pombal, Nuno Alvares Pereira and Viriato. On the side facing Rua Augusta is a monumental clock featuring naturalistic motifs. The entire monument was restored in 2013 and had an elevator placed inside to allow tourist visits to the terrace which is a beautiful viewpoint over Praça do Comércio and all of downtown.
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Arco de la Rua Augusta
2 R. Augusta
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It's best known as "Rua Augusta Arch" but its main façade faces Praça do Comércio. It's a triumphal arch designed in 1775 as a gateway to the city, but the version seen today dates from a century later, 1875. Sculptures at the top represent Glory crowning Genius and Valor. Below them are images of national heroes Vasco da Gama, the Marquis of Pombal, Nuno Alvares Pereira and Viriato. On the side facing Rua Augusta is a monumental clock featuring naturalistic motifs. The entire monument was restored in 2013 and had an elevator placed inside to allow tourist visits to the terrace which is a beautiful viewpoint over Praça do Comércio and all of downtown.
This Mannerist monument is one of the most beautiful Lisbon attractions, not just for its magnificent interior (which has the world's largest collection of Baroque tiles -- about 100,000), but also for the panoramic view over the city from the terrace by the towers. It was founded in 1147 and rebuilt in 1582 outside the city walls, hence the "de Fora" ("on the Outside") in the name. The church (which has free admission) has an imposing baroque altar and eight monumental sculptures, but it's not always open. The monastery next door, however, opens every day, allowing you to see the ancient cistern, the cloisters covered with magnificent tiles, the beautiful sacristy, a museum of sacred art.
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Church of São Vicente of Fora
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This Mannerist monument is one of the most beautiful Lisbon attractions, not just for its magnificent interior (which has the world's largest collection of Baroque tiles -- about 100,000), but also for the panoramic view over the city from the terrace by the towers. It was founded in 1147 and rebuilt in 1582 outside the city walls, hence the "de Fora" ("on the Outside") in the name. The church (which has free admission) has an imposing baroque altar and eight monumental sculptures, but it's not always open. The monastery next door, however, opens every day, allowing you to see the ancient cistern, the cloisters covered with magnificent tiles, the beautiful sacristy, a museum of sacred art.
Portugal's National Pantheon, also known as St. Engratia Church, took three centuries to complete. It's a baroque monument built on an octagonal floor plan centered on a Greek cross, with a dome standing out in the city's skyline. The colored-marble interior is the resting place of the most important cultural and political figures in the country, but perhaps most famous of all is singer Amalia Rodrigues. It also includes some symbolic tombs of other personalities such as Vasco da Gama, who is actually entombed elsewhere, in Jeronimos Monastery. Visitors may also go up to the dome's terrace for city views.
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Church of Santa Engrácia
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Portugal's National Pantheon, also known as St. Engratia Church, took three centuries to complete. It's a baroque monument built on an octagonal floor plan centered on a Greek cross, with a dome standing out in the city's skyline. The colored-marble interior is the resting place of the most important cultural and political figures in the country, but perhaps most famous of all is singer Amalia Rodrigues. It also includes some symbolic tombs of other personalities such as Vasco da Gama, who is actually entombed elsewhere, in Jeronimos Monastery. Visitors may also go up to the dome's terrace for city views.
The Royal Basilica of Estrela is one of Lisbon's most beautiful monuments and one of its most monumental churches. It's a baroque and neoclassical building built by Queen Maria I in 1790, in thanks for the birth of her son. The tomb of the queen, who died in Brazil, is found inside, by the door that leads to a remarkable baroque nativity scene with over 500 terracotta and cork images. It's the country's largest nativity scene, created by leading sculptor Machado de Castro. The interior is covered in polychrome marbles and paintings by the Italian artist Pompeo Batoni and by the Portuguese Cirilo Volkmar Machado, among others.
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Basílica da Estrela
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The Royal Basilica of Estrela is one of Lisbon's most beautiful monuments and one of its most monumental churches. It's a baroque and neoclassical building built by Queen Maria I in 1790, in thanks for the birth of her son. The tomb of the queen, who died in Brazil, is found inside, by the door that leads to a remarkable baroque nativity scene with over 500 terracotta and cork images. It's the country's largest nativity scene, created by leading sculptor Machado de Castro. The interior is covered in polychrome marbles and paintings by the Italian artist Pompeo Batoni and by the Portuguese Cirilo Volkmar Machado, among others.
Built in 1553, the Church of São Roque (St. Roch) is one of Lisbon's most magnificent monuments, due to its historical significance and artistic richness. A plain façade hides a rich interior, including the exuberant Chapel of St. John the Baptist, considered "the world's most expensive chapel." Built in Rome between 1742 and 1747, using the most precious materials, it was transported to Lisbon on three ships. It's now the fourth chapel on the left when facing the main altar, and is a true masterpiece of European art, mixing ivory, agate, lapis lazuli and gold. The other chapels are also rich in gilt, polychrome marbles, tiles, painting and sculpture.
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Igreja de São Roque
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Built in 1553, the Church of São Roque (St. Roch) is one of Lisbon's most magnificent monuments, due to its historical significance and artistic richness. A plain façade hides a rich interior, including the exuberant Chapel of St. John the Baptist, considered "the world's most expensive chapel." Built in Rome between 1742 and 1747, using the most precious materials, it was transported to Lisbon on three ships. It's now the fourth chapel on the left when facing the main altar, and is a true masterpiece of European art, mixing ivory, agate, lapis lazuli and gold. The other chapels are also rich in gilt, polychrome marbles, tiles, painting and sculpture.
Throughout most of its 500-year history, this neighborhood has maintained a certain bohemian and alternative atmosphere. Starting on Largo do Camões and entering Rua do Norte, this is where the night owls roam the streets looking for the perfect bar and restaurant.
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Barrio Alto de Lisboa
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Throughout most of its 500-year history, this neighborhood has maintained a certain bohemian and alternative atmosphere. Starting on Largo do Camões and entering Rua do Norte, this is where the night owls roam the streets looking for the perfect bar and restaurant.
This quaint medieval district (once the Moorish and Jewish quarter before it became a fishing community) is the oldest neighborhood in Europe after El Pópulo in Cadiz. It's like a small village, standing as a time capsule to the years before Lisbon was destroyed by the 1755 earthquake, as it remained standing thanks to its rock-solid foundations. Put away your map and wander aimlessly through its "becos" (alleys) and "largos" (small squares), allowing your senses to be the guides. You'll see magnificent river views and laundry out to dry from balconies, smell fish being grilled in a corner, hear the sounds of Fado coming out of a restaurant, taste authentic traditional meals.
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Alfama
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This quaint medieval district (once the Moorish and Jewish quarter before it became a fishing community) is the oldest neighborhood in Europe after El Pópulo in Cadiz. It's like a small village, standing as a time capsule to the years before Lisbon was destroyed by the 1755 earthquake, as it remained standing thanks to its rock-solid foundations. Put away your map and wander aimlessly through its "becos" (alleys) and "largos" (small squares), allowing your senses to be the guides. You'll see magnificent river views and laundry out to dry from balconies, smell fish being grilled in a corner, hear the sounds of Fado coming out of a restaurant, taste authentic traditional meals.
From outside, Lisbon's cathedral (also known as the Church of Santa Maria Maior) looks more like a castle in Romanesque-Gothic style, with defensive towers and battlements. Built in the 1100s, it's one of the oldest monuments in the city, and has undergone several alterations which added Baroque and Neoclassical details. Excavations in the Gothic cloister have revealed archaeological finds going back almost 3,000 years, from the Iron Age to the Middle Ages. On your way there you pass by several chapels with sarcophagi and tombs, including that of King Afonso IV in the main chapel, as well as a nativity scene from 1766, by sculptor Machado de Castro.
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Catedral de Lisboa
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From outside, Lisbon's cathedral (also known as the Church of Santa Maria Maior) looks more like a castle in Romanesque-Gothic style, with defensive towers and battlements. Built in the 1100s, it's one of the oldest monuments in the city, and has undergone several alterations which added Baroque and Neoclassical details. Excavations in the Gothic cloister have revealed archaeological finds going back almost 3,000 years, from the Iron Age to the Middle Ages. On your way there you pass by several chapels with sarcophagi and tombs, including that of King Afonso IV in the main chapel, as well as a nativity scene from 1766, by sculptor Machado de Castro.
Lisbon's most photographed street is probably Rua da Bica de Duarte Belo. It's in the historic and picturesque neighborhood of Bica, one of the city's most traditional neighborhoods, known for its small bars and especially for the iconic funicular that runs through it. Constantly photographed by tourists, the funicular has been going up and down the hill since 1892. The tiny neighborhood, found between the Bairro Alto and Cais do Sodré districts, is made up of cobbled lanes and stairways, dating back to 1597, after a landslide. The name comes from a 17th-century water fountain ("bica").
Calhariz - Bica
Lisbon's most photographed street is probably Rua da Bica de Duarte Belo. It's in the historic and picturesque neighborhood of Bica, one of the city's most traditional neighborhoods, known for its small bars and especially for the iconic funicular that runs through it. Constantly photographed by tourists, the funicular has been going up and down the hill since 1892. The tiny neighborhood, found between the Bairro Alto and Cais do Sodré districts, is made up of cobbled lanes and stairways, dating back to 1597, after a landslide. The name comes from a 17th-century water fountain ("bica").
Lisbon's most elegant and trendiest neighborhood is where everyone meets for coffee, shopping, or before dinner and a night out in neighboring Bairro Alto. Most of the buildings are from the 1700s, although many were restored in the 1990s by architect Álvaro Siza Vieira, after their destruction by a devastating fire in 1988. It's a neighborhood that flashes back to the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the "Belle Époque" when writers such as Fernando Pessoa and Eça de Queiroz used to write at the now-historic cafés. It's also the neighborhood of theaters, of charming old bookshops and major international brands, giving it a lively cosmopolitan ambience at any time of the day.
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Chiado
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Lisbon's most elegant and trendiest neighborhood is where everyone meets for coffee, shopping, or before dinner and a night out in neighboring Bairro Alto. Most of the buildings are from the 1700s, although many were restored in the 1990s by architect Álvaro Siza Vieira, after their destruction by a devastating fire in 1988. It's a neighborhood that flashes back to the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the "Belle Époque" when writers such as Fernando Pessoa and Eça de Queiroz used to write at the now-historic cafés. It's also the neighborhood of theaters, of charming old bookshops and major international brands, giving it a lively cosmopolitan ambience at any time of the day.
The official name of the square is Dom Pedro IV Square, but everyone knows it as Rossio. It marks the very center of the city, a lively space known for its wave-patterned mosaic pavements which have been reproduced everywhere from within Portugal to the beaches of Rio de Janeiro and the former Portuguese colony of Macao in China. It is faced by the neoclassical Dona Maria II Theater and a couple of legendary cafés, with the most attractive being the art deco Nicola. In the center are two baroque fountains and a monumental pedestal holding a statue of King Pedro IV.
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Rossio
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The official name of the square is Dom Pedro IV Square, but everyone knows it as Rossio. It marks the very center of the city, a lively space known for its wave-patterned mosaic pavements which have been reproduced everywhere from within Portugal to the beaches of Rio de Janeiro and the former Portuguese colony of Macao in China. It is faced by the neoclassical Dona Maria II Theater and a couple of legendary cafés, with the most attractive being the art deco Nicola. In the center are two baroque fountains and a monumental pedestal holding a statue of King Pedro IV.
Lisbon's grandest square faces the river, and was originally designed to welcome those arriving in the city by boat. What you see today is the 18th-century version, as the original square, named "Terreiro do Paço" and home to the royal palace, was destroyed in the 1755 earthquake. It was rebuilt with a triumphal arch facing the Tagus, and the surrounding arcaded buildings held government offices for many years. At the center is a monument to King José I. The square is also home to the city's oldest café, "Martinho da Arcada", and to the monumental Pousada hotel. There is also a tourist office, while across from it is the Lisboa Story Center.
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Terreiro do Paço
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Lisbon's grandest square faces the river, and was originally designed to welcome those arriving in the city by boat. What you see today is the 18th-century version, as the original square, named "Terreiro do Paço" and home to the royal palace, was destroyed in the 1755 earthquake. It was rebuilt with a triumphal arch facing the Tagus, and the surrounding arcaded buildings held government offices for many years. At the center is a monument to King José I. The square is also home to the city's oldest café, "Martinho da Arcada", and to the monumental Pousada hotel. There is also a tourist office, while across from it is the Lisboa Story Center.
Arts & Culture
Calouste Gulbenkian, an Armenian oil magnate, collected "only the best" and the result was one of the world's most important and most impressive private art collections. It includes masterpieces from various periods and areas, from Egyptian to Greco-Roman and Islamic art, in addition to European painting and decorative arts. Among the around 6500 pieces acquired by the collector are works by Rembrandt, Renoir, Rubens, Monet, Degas and Van Dyck, among others, together with textiles, faience and a unique collection of Lalique jewelry. Several works were purchased from the Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg.
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Museo Calouste Gulbenkian
45A Av. de Berna
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Calouste Gulbenkian, an Armenian oil magnate, collected "only the best" and the result was one of the world's most important and most impressive private art collections. It includes masterpieces from various periods and areas, from Egyptian to Greco-Roman and Islamic art, in addition to European painting and decorative arts. Among the around 6500 pieces acquired by the collector are works by Rembrandt, Renoir, Rubens, Monet, Degas and Van Dyck, among others, together with textiles, faience and a unique collection of Lalique jewelry. Several works were purchased from the Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg.
Portugal's "national gallery" is the Ancient Art Museum, opened in 1884 in a 17th-century palace. Its most significant works include Hieronymus Bosch's "Temptation of Saint Anthony" and Albrecht Dürer's "Saint Jerome," but the main highlight is a 15th century masterpiece attributed to Portuguese artist Nuno Gonçalves, called the "Panels of St. Vincent." It's one of the first collective portraits in European art, showing sixty portraits of various personalities, believed to be venerating Saint Vincent. One of them is Prince Henry the Navigator in his most famous illustration. In addition to painting, there is also a collection of sculpture and decorative arts.
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Museo Nacional de Arte Antiguo
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Portugal's "national gallery" is the Ancient Art Museum, opened in 1884 in a 17th-century palace. Its most significant works include Hieronymus Bosch's "Temptation of Saint Anthony" and Albrecht Dürer's "Saint Jerome," but the main highlight is a 15th century masterpiece attributed to Portuguese artist Nuno Gonçalves, called the "Panels of St. Vincent." It's one of the first collective portraits in European art, showing sixty portraits of various personalities, believed to be venerating Saint Vincent. One of them is Prince Henry the Navigator in his most famous illustration. In addition to painting, there is also a collection of sculpture and decorative arts.
Lisbon's most acclaimed modern and contemporary art collection is also recognized as one of Europe's best. It belongs to businessman Joe Berardo, a Portuguese millionaire who began collecting art with the assistance of his friend Francisco Capelo, whose own collection is seen in the city's Design and Fashion Museum. Berardo's collection offers a global perspective of visual arts from the 20th century to today, with an emphasis on European and American art. Some of the artists represented include Andy Warhol, Picasso, Joan Miró and Paula Rego.
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Centro Cultural de Belém
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Lisbon's most acclaimed modern and contemporary art collection is also recognized as one of Europe's best. It belongs to businessman Joe Berardo, a Portuguese millionaire who began collecting art with the assistance of his friend Francisco Capelo, whose own collection is seen in the city's Design and Fashion Museum. Berardo's collection offers a global perspective of visual arts from the 20th century to today, with an emphasis on European and American art. Some of the artists represented include Andy Warhol, Picasso, Joan Miró and Paula Rego.
This museum is one of Lisbon’s most visited attractions, and it’s easy to understand why as soon as you enter and see the world’s one-of-a-kind collection of magnificent carriages. These ostentatious vehicles transported European nobility and royalty throughout the centuries, and are now displayed in a modern building designed by Pritzker Prize winner Paulo Mendes da Rocha. It first opened in 1905 in the former royal riding school, which still presents coaches and berlins, together with royal family portraits. The oldest carriage dates back to the late 1500s, and is one of only two in the world that still survive from that time (the other one is in Moscow).
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National Coach Museum
136 Av. da Índia
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This museum is one of Lisbon’s most visited attractions, and it’s easy to understand why as soon as you enter and see the world’s one-of-a-kind collection of magnificent carriages. These ostentatious vehicles transported European nobility and royalty throughout the centuries, and are now displayed in a modern building designed by Pritzker Prize winner Paulo Mendes da Rocha. It first opened in 1905 in the former royal riding school, which still presents coaches and berlins, together with royal family portraits. The oldest carriage dates back to the late 1500s, and is one of only two in the world that still survive from that time (the other one is in Moscow).
Lisbon's Maritime Museum shows the city's and Portugal's pioneering role in the exploration of the oceans. It includes model ships from the Age of Discovery, a wooden figure representing the Archangel Raphael that accompanied Vasco da Gama on his voyage to India, ancient globes, old maps showing the world as it was then known, and the plane that made the first crossing of the South Atlantic in 1922 piloted by Portuguese aviators Gago Coutinho and Sacadura Cabral. Other highlights include 17th-century astrolabes found on shipwrecks off the coast of Brazil and Florida, and the cabins of the royal yacht "Amélia" dating from 1900.
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Museu de Marinha
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Lisbon's Maritime Museum shows the city's and Portugal's pioneering role in the exploration of the oceans. It includes model ships from the Age of Discovery, a wooden figure representing the Archangel Raphael that accompanied Vasco da Gama on his voyage to India, ancient globes, old maps showing the world as it was then known, and the plane that made the first crossing of the South Atlantic in 1922 piloted by Portuguese aviators Gago Coutinho and Sacadura Cabral. Other highlights include 17th-century astrolabes found on shipwrecks off the coast of Brazil and Florida, and the cabins of the royal yacht "Amélia" dating from 1900.
Founded in 1893, the former "Portuguese Ethnographic Museum" was installed in the former dormitory of the Jerónimos Monastery in 1903. It presents Portugal's rich archaeological heritage, with a valuable collection of jewelery, ceramics, sculpture and mosaics, mainly from Roman times. Many of the pieces are the result of archaeological excavations carried out between 1930 and 1960, but also of various donations, including by the Portuguese royal family. It also has pieces from ancient Egypt, but the main collection consists of artifacts from Portugal's prehistoric, Roman and medieval periods. It tells the thousands-old story of the people who inhabited the current Portuguese territory.
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Museu Nacional de Arqueologia
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Founded in 1893, the former "Portuguese Ethnographic Museum" was installed in the former dormitory of the Jerónimos Monastery in 1903. It presents Portugal's rich archaeological heritage, with a valuable collection of jewelery, ceramics, sculpture and mosaics, mainly from Roman times. Many of the pieces are the result of archaeological excavations carried out between 1930 and 1960, but also of various donations, including by the Portuguese royal family. It also has pieces from ancient Egypt, but the main collection consists of artifacts from Portugal's prehistoric, Roman and medieval periods. It tells the thousands-old story of the people who inhabited the current Portuguese territory.
The Tile Museum presents the history and evolution of the art of the ceramic tile in a magnificent convent from the 1500s, and is one of Lisbon's most beautiful and most impressive attractions. It's also unique in the world, since no other museum focuses on this art that originated in ancient Egypt, and that eventually spread across North Africa and Europe. A tour of the museum includes the splendid church and small Mannerist cloister from the 16th century, and the collection from the 15th century to the present is seen along the way. The most emblematic piece is a 36m-long composition of 1300 tiles illustrating Lisbon before the earthquake of 1755.
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Museo Nacional del Azulejo
4 R. Me. Deus
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The Tile Museum presents the history and evolution of the art of the ceramic tile in a magnificent convent from the 1500s, and is one of Lisbon's most beautiful and most impressive attractions. It's also unique in the world, since no other museum focuses on this art that originated in ancient Egypt, and that eventually spread across North Africa and Europe. A tour of the museum includes the splendid church and small Mannerist cloister from the 16th century, and the collection from the 15th century to the present is seen along the way. The most emblematic piece is a 36m-long composition of 1300 tiles illustrating Lisbon before the earthquake of 1755.
You don't have to be a fan of Fado music to enjoy the Fado Museum. Much more than a space about that musical genre, it also shows the cultural and political environment of much of 20th century Lisbon. An audio guide explains what is displayed (in Portuguese, English, French, or Spanish), and a multimedia service allows visitors to consult recordings, biographies, and images of the past. The museum restaurant is a surprisingly contemporary space (complete with Philippe Starck chairs) and serves Portuguese cuisine along with live Fado performances at night, while the shop is the place to pick up Fado recordings from the past and present.
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Museo del Fado
1 Largo do Chafariz de Dentro
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You don't have to be a fan of Fado music to enjoy the Fado Museum. Much more than a space about that musical genre, it also shows the cultural and political environment of much of 20th century Lisbon. An audio guide explains what is displayed (in Portuguese, English, French, or Spanish), and a multimedia service allows visitors to consult recordings, biographies, and images of the past. The museum restaurant is a surprisingly contemporary space (complete with Philippe Starck chairs) and serves Portuguese cuisine along with live Fado performances at night, while the shop is the place to pick up Fado recordings from the past and present.
Parks & Nature
Close to two acres of green space down the hill from Graça Church were closed to the public for centuries, but opened in 2015 after works that lasted several years. Around 180 trees and shrubs were planted for the new park, a central lawn was laid out, and a picnic area and orchard were created. This way visitors may stay in the shade or in the sun as they admire the view over old Lisbon, from the castle to the Mouraria district. There’s also a kiosk cafe with a terrace and a playground.
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Jardim da Cerca da Graça
46 Calçada Do Monte
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Close to two acres of green space down the hill from Graça Church were closed to the public for centuries, but opened in 2015 after works that lasted several years. Around 180 trees and shrubs were planted for the new park, a central lawn was laid out, and a picnic area and orchard were created. This way visitors may stay in the shade or in the sun as they admire the view over old Lisbon, from the castle to the Mouraria district. There’s also a kiosk cafe with a terrace and a playground.
This waterfront area between Praça do Comércio and Cais do Sodré was where many of the Portuguese explorers' ships were built. Today, after a redevelopment in 2013, it's a spacious landscaped promenade that invites you to sit in the sun. The redevelopment included the recreation of an old dock, but this is essentially a contemporary public space, largely pedestrianized. The two-lane traffic separates a staircase that descends towards the water and a park that extends towards the buildings of the Portuguese Navy. Although swimming is not allowed, this is considered the "beach" of central Lisbon, and there is a kiosk with a terrace for those who want to sit and admire the scenery.
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Avenida Ribeira das Naus
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This waterfront area between Praça do Comércio and Cais do Sodré was where many of the Portuguese explorers' ships were built. Today, after a redevelopment in 2013, it's a spacious landscaped promenade that invites you to sit in the sun. The redevelopment included the recreation of an old dock, but this is essentially a contemporary public space, largely pedestrianized. The two-lane traffic separates a staircase that descends towards the water and a park that extends towards the buildings of the Portuguese Navy. Although swimming is not allowed, this is considered the "beach" of central Lisbon, and there is a kiosk with a terrace for those who want to sit and admire the scenery.
Drinks & Nightlife
An 18th-century building, that was once a brothel rented by the hour to prostitutes and sailors, is now this naughty bar. There are two entrances, one on Rua do Alecrim (which includes space for a small terrace) and another on "Pink Street" (Rua Nova do Carvalho). It's decorated like a red-hot cabaret, and one of the rooms has kept the stripper pole. It's also a stage for concerts and other events.
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Pensão Amor
19 R. do Alecrim
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An 18th-century building, that was once a brothel rented by the hour to prostitutes and sailors, is now this naughty bar. There are two entrances, one on Rua do Alecrim (which includes space for a small terrace) and another on "Pink Street" (Rua Nova do Carvalho). It's decorated like a red-hot cabaret, and one of the rooms has kept the stripper pole. It's also a stage for concerts and other events.
It used to be a shop of fishing equipment and that past now inspires the décor (rods and hooks) of this café/bar. It also inspires what is served (or sold to have at home), because in addition to the drinks (beer and local wines) it offers tin cans of a variety of fish that may be accompanied by bread. It's open from afternoon to dawn, Tuesday to Saturday.
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Sol e Pesca
44 R. Nova do Carvalho
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It used to be a shop of fishing equipment and that past now inspires the décor (rods and hooks) of this café/bar. It also inspires what is served (or sold to have at home), because in addition to the drinks (beer and local wines) it offers tin cans of a variety of fish that may be accompanied by bread. It's open from afternoon to dawn, Tuesday to Saturday.
The undisputed king of all Lisbon clubs, this is also a bar and concert venue that hosts the city's hottest nights. Opened in 1998, it is owned by the same team as the Bica do Sapato restaurant next door (which includes actor John Malkovitch), featuring an always-fabulous interior, a spectacular rooftop terrace overlooking the river, special theme parties, and simply the best DJs in town (often including internationally renowned names). You'll always find long lines at the door every weekend night.
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LuxFrágil
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The undisputed king of all Lisbon clubs, this is also a bar and concert venue that hosts the city's hottest nights. Opened in 1998, it is owned by the same team as the Bica do Sapato restaurant next door (which includes actor John Malkovitch), featuring an always-fabulous interior, a spectacular rooftop terrace overlooking the river, special theme parties, and simply the best DJs in town (often including internationally renowned names). You'll always find long lines at the door every weekend night.
It looks like an antiques shop and could very well be a museum, but it's a bar that opens late in the afternoon. You must ring a bell to get inside, and once you do you find one of the city's most authentic spots. There's a total of five rooms decorated with curious objects (miniature trains, toy soldiers, old mugs, etc. from the owner's private collection), to admire as you sip a cocktail. There's an extensive list of drinks, from cocktails to juices, to teas and Port Wine. You may also play pool in one of the rooms.
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Pavilhão Chinês
89 R. Dom Pedro V
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It looks like an antiques shop and could very well be a museum, but it's a bar that opens late in the afternoon. You must ring a bell to get inside, and once you do you find one of the city's most authentic spots. There's a total of five rooms decorated with curious objects (miniature trains, toy soldiers, old mugs, etc. from the owner's private collection), to admire as you sip a cocktail. There's an extensive list of drinks, from cocktails to juices, to teas and Port Wine. You may also play pool in one of the rooms.
The rooftop of a car park (7th floor) was transformed into a bar with a beautiful view over the city, the river, and the bell towers of Santa Catarina Church. It opens daily at 1PM and only closes late at night. It's filled with wooden furniture and small potted trees to create the feeling of a garden. It presents a varied calendar of events, including performances by DJs and outdoor cinema, and there is still room for meals (burgers of meat, fish and soy).
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Roof Top Bar
7 Tv. André Valente
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The rooftop of a car park (7th floor) was transformed into a bar with a beautiful view over the city, the river, and the bell towers of Santa Catarina Church. It opens daily at 1PM and only closes late at night. It's filled with wooden furniture and small potted trees to create the feeling of a garden. It presents a varied calendar of events, including performances by DJs and outdoor cinema, and there is still room for meals (burgers of meat, fish and soy).
Chapitô is a circus school that's actually become better known for its restaurant and bar. It has a very inviting terrace with fantastic city views, where you're served a menu of contemporary Portuguese cuisine. The more formal and romantic interior dining area has even better views. Downstairs is the bar ("Bartô"), which opens at night, often staging alternative theater and live music performances.
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Chapitô y Restô
7 Costa do Castelo
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Chapitô is a circus school that's actually become better known for its restaurant and bar. It has a very inviting terrace with fantastic city views, where you're served a menu of contemporary Portuguese cuisine. The more formal and romantic interior dining area has even better views. Downstairs is the bar ("Bartô"), which opens at night, often staging alternative theater and live music performances.
Getting Around
Tram 28 - A Tour Through Old Lisbon It's perhaps Lisbon's most popular activity: A ride back in time over hills and medieval streets in vintage trams that are still part of the city's public transportation network. They go past some major attractions, and we take you on a virtual tour below.
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Largo da Graça
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Tram 28 - A Tour Through Old Lisbon It's perhaps Lisbon's most popular activity: A ride back in time over hills and medieval streets in vintage trams that are still part of the city's public transportation network. They go past some major attractions, and we take you on a virtual tour below.
Tram 28 - A Tour Through Old Lisbon (first station) It's perhaps Lisbon's most popular activity: A ride back in time over hills and medieval streets in vintage trams that are still part of the city's public transportation network. They go past some major attractions, and we take you on a virtual tour below.
Martim Moniz
19 R. Guilherme Braga
Tram 28 - A Tour Through Old Lisbon (first station) It's perhaps Lisbon's most popular activity: A ride back in time over hills and medieval streets in vintage trams that are still part of the city's public transportation network. They go past some major attractions, and we take you on a virtual tour below.
Metro / Subway station (green line) Only 5 minutes walking distance from the apartment.
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Martim Moniz
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Metro / Subway station (green line) Only 5 minutes walking distance from the apartment.
To Cascais you can take the train on Cais do Sodré station. It takes a 45 minutes beautiful trip along the river.
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Cais do Sodré
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To Cascais you can take the train on Cais do Sodré station. It takes a 45 minutes beautiful trip along the river.
To Belém you can get Tram 15 from Praça da Figueira. It's a 30 minutes trip.
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Estatua del rey Juan I de Portugal
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To Belém you can get Tram 15 from Praça da Figueira. It's a 30 minutes trip.
To Sintra you can take the train on Rossio station. It takes a 45 minutes.
Praça Dom Pedro IV
To Sintra you can take the train on Rossio station. It takes a 45 minutes.
Rent a Bike Ideal to get on a train to Sintra or a tram around Lisbon, use a funicular or a taxi, with a Brompton you won't avoid enjoying your life because of your bike, since it always fits any luggage compartment. You can go inside any monument, a restaurant or even leave the bike in the comfort of your own room without concerns so you don't even need to carry a locker. Because they allow the best rides around the city or even long tours towards other destinations, we only rent Brompton bikes because they are the most robust, yet versatile folding bikes.
Bike Pop
21 Largo do Intendente Pina Manique
Rent a Bike Ideal to get on a train to Sintra or a tram around Lisbon, use a funicular or a taxi, with a Brompton you won't avoid enjoying your life because of your bike, since it always fits any luggage compartment. You can go inside any monument, a restaurant or even leave the bike in the comfort of your own room without concerns so you don't even need to carry a locker. Because they allow the best rides around the city or even long tours towards other destinations, we only rent Brompton bikes because they are the most robust, yet versatile folding bikes.