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Mira's Guidebook

Mira

Mira's Guidebook

Sightseeing
The Great Pyramid of Giza (the largest of the three) is the oldest and is the only one of the “Seven Wonders of the Ancient World” which is still standing
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Pirámides de Giza
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 The Great Pyramid of Giza (the largest of the three) is the oldest and is the only one of the “Seven Wonders of the Ancient World” which is still standing
One of the world’s most important collections of ancient artefacts, the Egyptian Museum takes pride of place in Downtown Cairo, on the north side of Midan Tahrir. Inside the great domed, oddly pinkish building, the glittering treasures of Tutankhamun and other great pharaohs lie alongside the grave goods, mummies, jewellery, eating bowls and toys of Egyptians whose names are lost to history. To walk around the museum is to embark on an adventure through time.
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Egyptian Museum Cairo
15 Meret Basha
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One of the world’s most important collections of ancient artefacts, the Egyptian Museum takes pride of place in Downtown Cairo, on the north side of Midan Tahrir. Inside the great domed, oddly pinkish building, the glittering treasures of Tutankhamun and other great pharaohs lie alongside the grave goods, mummies, jewellery, eating bowls and toys of Egyptians whose names are lost to history. To walk around the museum is to embark on an adventure through time.
Founded in AD 970 as the centrepiece of the newly created Fatimid city, Al Azhar is one of Cairo’s earlier mosques, and its sheikh is considered the highest theological authority for Egyptian Muslims. The building is a harmonious blend of architectural styles, the result of numerous enlargements over more than 1000 years. The tomb chamber, located through a doorway on the left just inside the entrance, has a beautiful mihrab (a niche indicating the direction of Mecca) and should not be missed.
Mezquita de al-Azhar
Founded in AD 970 as the centrepiece of the newly created Fatimid city, Al Azhar is one of Cairo’s earlier mosques, and its sheikh is considered the highest theological authority for Egyptian Muslims. The building is a harmonious blend of architectural styles, the result of numerous enlargements over more than 1000 years. The tomb chamber, located through a doorway on the left just inside the entrance, has a beautiful mihrab (a niche indicating the direction of Mecca) and should not be missed.
Salah El Din was born in 1137 AD in Tikrit, Iraq, he studied the Quran, theology, astronomy, mathematics, and law. As a member of the military at that time, he was trained by his uncle Asad-al-Din Shirkoh, who was a commander of the Zengid Dynasty.    Salah El Din was capable of taking on leading responsibilities during military campaigns, and that’s because of his extraordinary performance during battles. His great capabilities and cleverly executed tactics also allowed him to move on from being a soldier to be the King of both Egypt and Syria. His power enabled him to overthrow the Fatimids and maintain authority in Egypt.    The Citadel became the centerpiece of these great fortifications, protecting the city from the heights of the rocky hills that overlooked it. Completed in 1183 AD, Saladin’s Citadel served as the seat of government in Egypt for 700 years until Khedive Ismail moved into Abdeen Palace in newly constructed Downtown Cairo in the 1870s. The Citadel looks very different today than it did in its original capacity as a fortress the Crusader armies. It has been expanded and remodeled by many different rulers. In the 14th century, Sultan Al-Nasir Muhammed built a mosque there that still bears his name and the Southern Enclosure of the fort next to Saladin’s original walls. The most noticeable changes came in the 19th century.
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Salah El Din Al Ayouby Citadel
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Salah El Din was born in 1137 AD in Tikrit, Iraq, he studied the Quran, theology, astronomy, mathematics, and law. As a member of the military at that time, he was trained by his uncle Asad-al-Din Shirkoh, who was a commander of the Zengid Dynasty.    Salah El Din was capable of taking on leading responsibilities during military campaigns, and that’s because of his extraordinary performance during battles. His great capabilities and cleverly executed tactics also allowed him to move on from being a soldier to be the King of both Egypt and Syria. His power enabled him to overthrow the Fatimids and maintain authority in Egypt.    The Citadel became the centerpiece of these great fortifications, protecting the city from the heights of the rocky hills that overlooked it. Completed in 1183 AD, Saladin’s Citadel served as the seat of government in Egypt for 700 years until Khedive Ismail moved into Abdeen Palace in newly constructed Downtown Cairo in the 1870s. The Citadel looks very different today than it did in its original capacity as a fortress the Crusader armies. It has been expanded and remodeled by many different rulers. In the 14th century, Sultan Al-Nasir Muhammed built a mosque there that still bears his name and the Southern Enclosure of the fort next to Saladin’s original walls. The most noticeable changes came in the 19th century.  
However, when Muhammed Ali came to power, he was determined to erase the influence of the Mamluks, who had controlled Egypt for six centuries before him, and demolished their palaces within the fortress. He also built one of Cairo’s most recognizable landmarks.    His Alabaster Mosque, built in memory of a deceased son, towers over the rest of the complex. Its silhouette is the most dominant feature of Cairo’s eastern skyline. In addition to these two mosques, the Citadel also contains the National Military Museum, full of uniforms and weapons from Egypt long history, a Police Museum, and several more museums dedicated to the palace of Muhammed Ali.
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Mosque of Muhammad Ali
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However, when Muhammed Ali came to power, he was determined to erase the influence of the Mamluks, who had controlled Egypt for six centuries before him, and demolished their palaces within the fortress. He also built one of Cairo’s most recognizable landmarks.    His Alabaster Mosque, built in memory of a deceased son, towers over the rest of the complex. Its silhouette is the most dominant feature of Cairo’s eastern skyline. In addition to these two mosques, the Citadel also contains the National Military Museum, full of uniforms and weapons from Egypt long history, a Police Museum, and several more museums dedicated to the palace of Muhammed Ali.  
This museum, founded in 1908, houses Coptic art from the earliest days of Christianity in Egypt right through to early Islam. It is a beautiful place, as much for the elaborate woodcarving in all the galleries as for the treasures they contain. These include sculpture that shows obvious continuity from the Ptolemaic period, rich textiles and whole walls of monastery frescoes. Allow at least a couple of hours to explore the 1200 or so pieces on display.
The Coptic Museum
This museum, founded in 1908, houses Coptic art from the earliest days of Christianity in Egypt right through to early Islam. It is a beautiful place, as much for the elaborate woodcarving in all the galleries as for the treasures they contain. These include sculpture that shows obvious continuity from the Ptolemaic period, rich textiles and whole walls of monastery frescoes. Allow at least a couple of hours to explore the 1200 or so pieces on display.
shopping
No trip to Cairo would be complete without a visit to Khan Al-Khalili. The bazaar is loud, crowded, colorful, and exciting—full of all kinds of goods and shiny baubles. You can find the typical tourist trinkets here, but don’t let them distract you from the genuinely fine shopping to be found here.   There is a spice market where you can buy fresh spices of any variety. The perfume market is awash with countless mixing scents of essential oils. Deeper into the market there are gold vendors and antique shops full of interesting pieces.   There are fabric shops and carpet vendors and sellers of just about anything you might desire. If you cannot find what you are looking for, do not hesitate to ask a vendor because there is a good chance they will know where to find it. When was Khan Al-Khalili bazaar built, and who built it?  The market dates back to the 14th century when Emir Dajaharks Al-Khalili built a large market complex on the site of the Za’afran Tomb, which had been the burial place of the Fatimid rulers of Egypt. This construction was part of the process of rebuilding started under Sultan Barquq (ruled 1382-1399) to help the city recover from the ravages of the Black Death throughout the 13th and 14th centuries.   Today the market has been modernized significantly, but there are still portions that display the original Mamluk style architecture, which featured great archways and vaulted ceilings. The market has several restaurants and cafés spread throughout where you can take a break from shopping.
Khan Khalili
No trip to Cairo would be complete without a visit to Khan Al-Khalili. The bazaar is loud, crowded, colorful, and exciting—full of all kinds of goods and shiny baubles. You can find the typical tourist trinkets here, but don’t let them distract you from the genuinely fine shopping to be found here.   There is a spice market where you can buy fresh spices of any variety. The perfume market is awash with countless mixing scents of essential oils. Deeper into the market there are gold vendors and antique shops full of interesting pieces.   There are fabric shops and carpet vendors and sellers of just about anything you might desire. If you cannot find what you are looking for, do not hesitate to ask a vendor because there is a good chance they will know where to find it. When was Khan Al-Khalili bazaar built, and who built it?  The market dates back to the 14th century when Emir Dajaharks Al-Khalili built a large market complex on the site of the Za’afran Tomb, which had been the burial place of the Fatimid rulers of Egypt. This construction was part of the process of rebuilding started under Sultan Barquq (ruled 1382-1399) to help the city recover from the ravages of the Black Death throughout the 13th and 14th centuries.   Today the market has been modernized significantly, but there are still portions that display the original Mamluk style architecture, which featured great archways and vaulted ceilings. The market has several restaurants and cafés spread throughout where you can take a break from shopping. 
Bar & Restaurant
bar & restaurant
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Cairo Jazz Club
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bar & restaurant
U Bistro & Bar
157 Baehler's Mansions
Cairo Cellar
22 Taha Hussein
Rooftop zamalek
Food Scene
Oriental food
Koshary El-Tahrir
Oriental food
oriental food
Gad Restaurant
47 Gameat Al Dewal Al Arabeya
oriental food
Arabian food
Magrashi Restaurant For Saudi & Gulf Food
3 El-Khaleel
Arabian food
Indian food
Red Elephant Resturant
Indian food
Japanese food
Mori Sushi
Japanese food
Lebanese food
Serena Eatery Mohandseen
Lebanese food
Seafood
Asmak Restaurant
26 Nile St
Seafood