Guia de Isabel

Isabel

Guia de Isabel

Passeios turísticos
To get to the Schilthorn from the valley floor, a series of cable cars must be taken. The cable cars begin in Stechelberg leaving to Gimmelwald and then onto Mürren. From Mürren another cable car is taken to Birg, which is the final change before the Schilthorn. This cable airway is the longest and was the most technically challenging airway to be built. The other way up is to take the cable car from Lauterbrunnen to Grütschalp and a train to Mürren, from where the cable car must be taken. Between Birg and the summit, the cable car passes over Grauseeli, a small lake. It is also possible to hike to the peak, along the myriad of small, but well-marked paths to the top. The hike to the top takes roughly five hours from Gimmelwald for a fit walker. The panoramic revolving restaurant at the summit, Piz Gloria, was featured in the 1969 James Bond movie On Her Majesty's Secret Service. A black ski run featured in the film starts at the summit and leads down to the Engetal below Birg. The restaurant revolves a full 360 degrees in 45 minutes, slightly faster than the minute hand of a clock. The view includes Titlis, along Eiger, Mönch and Jungfrau to Mont Blanc. After considering a number of locations, the stalled construction of the sports bar atop the Schilthorn was chosen when the film's producer financed the completion of the famous revolving platform for the right to use the facility for his next film, the first and only Bond film starring George Lazenby. A number of scenes in the film were photographed by cameraman John Jordan hanging below a speeding helicopter. Jordan had previously lost a foot to a helicopter rotor while filming the previous Bond movie You Only Live Twice. Within a year and fitted with a prosthetic limb, Jordan lost his footing and fell 600 metres (2,000 ft) to his death when filming similar aerial imagery used in the film.
19
personas locales recomiendan
Schilthorn
19
personas locales recomiendan
To get to the Schilthorn from the valley floor, a series of cable cars must be taken. The cable cars begin in Stechelberg leaving to Gimmelwald and then onto Mürren. From Mürren another cable car is taken to Birg, which is the final change before the Schilthorn. This cable airway is the longest and was the most technically challenging airway to be built. The other way up is to take the cable car from Lauterbrunnen to Grütschalp and a train to Mürren, from where the cable car must be taken. Between Birg and the summit, the cable car passes over Grauseeli, a small lake. It is also possible to hike to the peak, along the myriad of small, but well-marked paths to the top. The hike to the top takes roughly five hours from Gimmelwald for a fit walker. The panoramic revolving restaurant at the summit, Piz Gloria, was featured in the 1969 James Bond movie On Her Majesty's Secret Service. A black ski run featured in the film starts at the summit and leads down to the Engetal below Birg. The restaurant revolves a full 360 degrees in 45 minutes, slightly faster than the minute hand of a clock. The view includes Titlis, along Eiger, Mönch and Jungfrau to Mont Blanc. After considering a number of locations, the stalled construction of the sports bar atop the Schilthorn was chosen when the film's producer financed the completion of the famous revolving platform for the right to use the facility for his next film, the first and only Bond film starring George Lazenby. A number of scenes in the film were photographed by cameraman John Jordan hanging below a speeding helicopter. Jordan had previously lost a foot to a helicopter rotor while filming the previous Bond movie You Only Live Twice. Within a year and fitted with a prosthetic limb, Jordan lost his footing and fell 600 metres (2,000 ft) to his death when filming similar aerial imagery used in the film.
From Interlaken Ost station to Lauterbrunnen or Grindelwald via the Bernese Oberland Railway. Change to the Wengernalp rack railway and go to Kleine Scheidegg. Ride the Jungfrau Railway directly from there to Jungfraujoch – Top of Europe. Journey time from Interlaken-Ost: 2 hours. Icy air streams across your face, snow crunches under your feet, and the view nearly takes your breath away: on one side the view of the Mittelland up to the Vosges, on the other the Aletsch glacier, bordered by four thousand metre peaks. Standing on the Jungfraujoch 3,454 metres above sea level, you can feel it with your first step: this is a different world. It's one you have to experience. Jungfraujoch Bernese Alps.jpg The Bernese Alps with Jungfrau in the middle, and Jungfraujoch, its saddle, to the right, and the Jungfraufirn; as seen from east Highest point Elevation 3,466 m (11,371 ft) [1] Coordinates 46°32′50″N 7°58′50″E  Naming English translation Virgin Yoke Language of name German Geography Jungfraujoch is located in SwitzerlandJungfraujochJungfraujoch Location in Switzerland Country Switzerland Cantons Bern and Valais Parent range Bernese Alps Topo map Swiss Federal Office for Topography - swisstopo Climbing First ascent traversed by Leslie Stephen and party (1862) Since 1912, the Jungfraujoch has been accessible to tourists by the Jungfrau line, a railway from Interlaken and Kleine Scheidegg, running partly underground through a tunnel through the Eiger and Mönch. The Jungfraujoch railway station, at an elevation of 3,454 metres (11,332 ft) is the highest in Europe. It lies east of the saddle, below the Sphinx station, and is connected to the Top of Europe building, which includes several panoramic restaurants and a post office. Several tunnels lead outside, where secured hiking trails on the crevassed glacier can be followed, in particular to the Mönchsjoch Hut. The Sphinx Observatory, one of the highest astronomical observatories in the world, provides an additional viewing platform at a height of 3,572 metres (11,719 ft). It can be reached by an elevator from the Jungfraujoch. The observatory houses one of the Global Atmosphere Watch's atmospheric research stations. The Jungfraujoch radio relay station, which is not accessible to the public, is installed west of the Jungfraujoch, on the Jungfrau ridge. It is Europe's highest radio relay station.
7
personas locales recomiendan
Jungfrau
7
personas locales recomiendan
From Interlaken Ost station to Lauterbrunnen or Grindelwald via the Bernese Oberland Railway. Change to the Wengernalp rack railway and go to Kleine Scheidegg. Ride the Jungfrau Railway directly from there to Jungfraujoch – Top of Europe. Journey time from Interlaken-Ost: 2 hours. Icy air streams across your face, snow crunches under your feet, and the view nearly takes your breath away: on one side the view of the Mittelland up to the Vosges, on the other the Aletsch glacier, bordered by four thousand metre peaks. Standing on the Jungfraujoch 3,454 metres above sea level, you can feel it with your first step: this is a different world. It's one you have to experience. Jungfraujoch Bernese Alps.jpg The Bernese Alps with Jungfrau in the middle, and Jungfraujoch, its saddle, to the right, and the Jungfraufirn; as seen from east Highest point Elevation 3,466 m (11,371 ft) [1] Coordinates 46°32′50″N 7°58′50″E  Naming English translation Virgin Yoke Language of name German Geography Jungfraujoch is located in SwitzerlandJungfraujochJungfraujoch Location in Switzerland Country Switzerland Cantons Bern and Valais Parent range Bernese Alps Topo map Swiss Federal Office for Topography - swisstopo Climbing First ascent traversed by Leslie Stephen and party (1862) Since 1912, the Jungfraujoch has been accessible to tourists by the Jungfrau line, a railway from Interlaken and Kleine Scheidegg, running partly underground through a tunnel through the Eiger and Mönch. The Jungfraujoch railway station, at an elevation of 3,454 metres (11,332 ft) is the highest in Europe. It lies east of the saddle, below the Sphinx station, and is connected to the Top of Europe building, which includes several panoramic restaurants and a post office. Several tunnels lead outside, where secured hiking trails on the crevassed glacier can be followed, in particular to the Mönchsjoch Hut. The Sphinx Observatory, one of the highest astronomical observatories in the world, provides an additional viewing platform at a height of 3,572 metres (11,719 ft). It can be reached by an elevator from the Jungfraujoch. The observatory houses one of the Global Atmosphere Watch's atmospheric research stations. The Jungfraujoch radio relay station, which is not accessible to the public, is installed west of the Jungfraujoch, on the Jungfrau ridge. It is Europe's highest radio relay station.
The notorious Eiger stands at 3970m above Grindelwald and has been enthralling visitors to the valley for decades, most notably since 1858 when local Mountain Guides Christian Almer and Peter Bohren together with their guest Charles Barrington, reached the summit for the first time. The Eiger began attracting a wealth of aspiring mountaineers from all over Europe wishing to tackle its steep north face – known as the ‘last problem of the Alps’ in north face climbing terms. It was finally conquered in 1938 by Anderl Heckmair, Fritz Kasparek, Ludwig Vörg and Heinrich Harrer, in a battle waged over 4 days. Inspired by the myth of the Eiger, the trail running event Eiger Ultra Trail was launched in 2013. The race routes take in the most breath-taking viewpoints this area has to offer, passing through Grosse Scheidegg, First, Faulhorn (2680m), Schynige Platte, Wengen, Männlichen and Kleine Scheidegg, before tackling the awesome traverse along the base of the Eiger North Face itself. This Ultra Trail is a truly spectacular alpine experience for trail runners and all spectators. The E101, a race of 101km and 6700m height difference is a mighty challenge to even the most seasoned of trail runners. The E51 winds its wicked way to the Faulhorn at 2680m, where competitors are rewarded for their efforts with stunning panoramic views of the surrounding peaks as the route continues on towards Schynige Platte. This route also has a Couples category for those wishing to test their strength -and friendship- as a team of 2. The E35 race delivers a great challenging route, while the E16 is suitable for all newcomers to trail running or as a fast tempo run for more ambitious runners. With the Trail Surprise on Friday a new concept was created for the relatives and supporters.
Eiger Trail
The notorious Eiger stands at 3970m above Grindelwald and has been enthralling visitors to the valley for decades, most notably since 1858 when local Mountain Guides Christian Almer and Peter Bohren together with their guest Charles Barrington, reached the summit for the first time. The Eiger began attracting a wealth of aspiring mountaineers from all over Europe wishing to tackle its steep north face – known as the ‘last problem of the Alps’ in north face climbing terms. It was finally conquered in 1938 by Anderl Heckmair, Fritz Kasparek, Ludwig Vörg and Heinrich Harrer, in a battle waged over 4 days. Inspired by the myth of the Eiger, the trail running event Eiger Ultra Trail was launched in 2013. The race routes take in the most breath-taking viewpoints this area has to offer, passing through Grosse Scheidegg, First, Faulhorn (2680m), Schynige Platte, Wengen, Männlichen and Kleine Scheidegg, before tackling the awesome traverse along the base of the Eiger North Face itself. This Ultra Trail is a truly spectacular alpine experience for trail runners and all spectators. The E101, a race of 101km and 6700m height difference is a mighty challenge to even the most seasoned of trail runners. The E51 winds its wicked way to the Faulhorn at 2680m, where competitors are rewarded for their efforts with stunning panoramic views of the surrounding peaks as the route continues on towards Schynige Platte. This route also has a Couples category for those wishing to test their strength -and friendship- as a team of 2. The E35 race delivers a great challenging route, while the E16 is suitable for all newcomers to trail running or as a fast tempo run for more ambitious runners. With the Trail Surprise on Friday a new concept was created for the relatives and supporters.
The magnificent glacier fed Trümmelbach Falls (Trümmelbachfälle), a series of 10 waterfalls in a cave-like environment, is hidden inside a mountain in the Lauterbrunnen Valley. It's a natural UNESCO World heritage site, and rightly so. A tunnel elevator takes the edge off an otherwise steep climb. The lift leads up to a platform from where the uppermost waterfalls are accessed. The path leads over a small bridge, up a few flights of stairs and walkways and partly through dimly lit tunnels to the highest waterfall. Freezing spray makes path and stairs slippery and the caves damp. Spray and droplets from above won't let you get away dry. Melt water flowing down from Eiger, Mönch and Jungfrau form a powerful raging torrent that carries 20'000 liter water per second through the caves. The torrent carved its way through solid rock and debris over thousands of years and sculpted elegant and impressive shaped of rock formations. The result is spectacular and the thunder from crashing waters deafening. Small lookouts and cutouts along the way provide viewing points to the ten chutes that fall into foaming pools and disappear into darkness. It's a spectacle of milky glacier water twisting, tumbling and pirouetting its way down over sculpted rocks and hitting the walls of the narrow slot canyon. Once the last chute is reached one backtracks down to the lift platform from where one can take the elevator or continue to walk back down to the entrance to see the last two of the ten chutes tumble into the Trümmelbach River. It's steep and the stairs 'go straight to the knees' but the view over the Lauterbrunenn valley is gorgeous. It's not easy to make good photos , and mine certainly don't do justice to the impressive waterfalls. What's more, a friend lent me a camera and the battery died half way into my journey. Yeah, I know :) Instead of returning by post bus to Lauterbrunnen, one can hike back through lush and flat farm meadows along the famous Staubbach Falls (Staubbach Fälle) that cascade down from sheer rock faces. At the edge of the village, a steep gravel footpath branches off from the country road and leads up to one of the falls. A short tunnel ends at a viewing platform where one can see sheets of water crash down right in front of visitors.
16
personas locales recomiendan
Trummelbach
16
personas locales recomiendan
The magnificent glacier fed Trümmelbach Falls (Trümmelbachfälle), a series of 10 waterfalls in a cave-like environment, is hidden inside a mountain in the Lauterbrunnen Valley. It's a natural UNESCO World heritage site, and rightly so. A tunnel elevator takes the edge off an otherwise steep climb. The lift leads up to a platform from where the uppermost waterfalls are accessed. The path leads over a small bridge, up a few flights of stairs and walkways and partly through dimly lit tunnels to the highest waterfall. Freezing spray makes path and stairs slippery and the caves damp. Spray and droplets from above won't let you get away dry. Melt water flowing down from Eiger, Mönch and Jungfrau form a powerful raging torrent that carries 20'000 liter water per second through the caves. The torrent carved its way through solid rock and debris over thousands of years and sculpted elegant and impressive shaped of rock formations. The result is spectacular and the thunder from crashing waters deafening. Small lookouts and cutouts along the way provide viewing points to the ten chutes that fall into foaming pools and disappear into darkness. It's a spectacle of milky glacier water twisting, tumbling and pirouetting its way down over sculpted rocks and hitting the walls of the narrow slot canyon. Once the last chute is reached one backtracks down to the lift platform from where one can take the elevator or continue to walk back down to the entrance to see the last two of the ten chutes tumble into the Trümmelbach River. It's steep and the stairs 'go straight to the knees' but the view over the Lauterbrunenn valley is gorgeous. It's not easy to make good photos , and mine certainly don't do justice to the impressive waterfalls. What's more, a friend lent me a camera and the battery died half way into my journey. Yeah, I know :) Instead of returning by post bus to Lauterbrunnen, one can hike back through lush and flat farm meadows along the famous Staubbach Falls (Staubbach Fälle) that cascade down from sheer rock faces. At the edge of the village, a steep gravel footpath branches off from the country road and leads up to one of the falls. A short tunnel ends at a viewing platform where one can see sheets of water crash down right in front of visitors.
The architecturally spectacular Susten Road mainly serves tourism and is therefore one of the last to be cleared of snow, often remaining closed from the beginning of November until June. The route begins in Wassen on the Gotthard axis, where it negotiates the jagged estuary gorge of the Meienreuss River via several tunnels. At the beginning one sees the Swiss Federal Railway’s (SBB) boldly designed Gotthard line, which runs through several switchback tunnels to overcome the steep climb. At the head of the valley the Sustenen Road leads to Meien Valley, where the characteristic peaks of the Fünffingerstock come into view. Near the rear of the valley, the road climbs again in several tight curves to the top of the Pass in the short summit tunnel. Shortly before the tunnel, a sweeping view extends over the vast basin of the Meien valley to the Sustenhorn. On the Bernese side of the tunnel, a large parking lot and the Susten Hospiz, located a few meters above the Pass road, invites you to rest awhile. During the ride through the valley the stunning panorama of the Gadmen Valley and the Steinen Glacier comes into view. During the two-hour hike on the glacier trail one can glean interesting information from the thematic markers. The starting point is the Hotel Steingletscher on the Pass road. With occasionally tight curves, the road leads down to Gadmen Village with its beautiful old houses. After the village of Nessental, a tiny road on the right hand side climbs to Engstligennalp, and to the mountain lake of the same name. This is the starting point of a popular hiking tour, which includes a spectacular cable car ride over the Jochpass to Lake Trübsee and further on in the direction of the holiday resort of Engelberg in Central Switzerland. Near Innertkirchen the Susten Pass road meets the Grimsel Pass road. At this juncture we recommend an excursion to the Aare Gorge that breaks through a mighty rock wall - a vestige of the Ice Age. Over thousands of years, the waters of the young Aare River pushed deeper and deeper through the rock until the spectacular canyon was created.
Puerto de Susten
The architecturally spectacular Susten Road mainly serves tourism and is therefore one of the last to be cleared of snow, often remaining closed from the beginning of November until June. The route begins in Wassen on the Gotthard axis, where it negotiates the jagged estuary gorge of the Meienreuss River via several tunnels. At the beginning one sees the Swiss Federal Railway’s (SBB) boldly designed Gotthard line, which runs through several switchback tunnels to overcome the steep climb. At the head of the valley the Sustenen Road leads to Meien Valley, where the characteristic peaks of the Fünffingerstock come into view. Near the rear of the valley, the road climbs again in several tight curves to the top of the Pass in the short summit tunnel. Shortly before the tunnel, a sweeping view extends over the vast basin of the Meien valley to the Sustenhorn. On the Bernese side of the tunnel, a large parking lot and the Susten Hospiz, located a few meters above the Pass road, invites you to rest awhile. During the ride through the valley the stunning panorama of the Gadmen Valley and the Steinen Glacier comes into view. During the two-hour hike on the glacier trail one can glean interesting information from the thematic markers. The starting point is the Hotel Steingletscher on the Pass road. With occasionally tight curves, the road leads down to Gadmen Village with its beautiful old houses. After the village of Nessental, a tiny road on the right hand side climbs to Engstligennalp, and to the mountain lake of the same name. This is the starting point of a popular hiking tour, which includes a spectacular cable car ride over the Jochpass to Lake Trübsee and further on in the direction of the holiday resort of Engelberg in Central Switzerland. Near Innertkirchen the Susten Pass road meets the Grimsel Pass road. At this juncture we recommend an excursion to the Aare Gorge that breaks through a mighty rock wall - a vestige of the Ice Age. Over thousands of years, the waters of the young Aare River pushed deeper and deeper through the rock until the spectacular canyon was created.
Wengen was first mentioned in official documents 751 years ago in 1268, and the origin of the name is unknown. Primarily an alpine farming community, the village began to be visited by tourists in the early 19th century. Mary and Percy Bysshe Shelley's History of a Six Weeks' Tour and Byron's Manfred, in which the scenery of the area is described, were published in 1817. This literature became the advent of the modern tourism industry for the village.[1] Felix Mendelssohn, to whom there is a memorial above the village, also visited in the early nineteenth century. Guesthouses and hotels began to be built in the mid-19th century, with the opening of the Launerhaus in 1859, with accommodation for 30 guests, and in 1880 the Pension Wengen was available to 100 guests.[1] The building and opening of the Wengernalpbahn in the 1890s made the village more accessible to tourists who previously had to walk up the steep slopes to the alpine village, opening the area for an expansion of tourism and the beginning of the ski industry.[2] In the early 20th century, British tourists started ski-clubs in the area, beginning in the nearby village of Mürren. By 1903 Wengen had an Anglican Church and two years later, Sir Henry Lunn formed the Public Schools Alpine Sports Club with Wengen as a destination ski area for the members.[1] A British Methodist minister, Lunn first visited the area to organize a meeting of Protestant churches in nearby Grindelwald where he learned about winter sports such as skiing. He returned to the area in 1896 with his son Arnold, who quickly learned to ski, and both father and son realized the potential in the future of winter sports. The club was established a few years later. Members of the Public Schools Alpine Sports Club were required to have attended an English public school or one of the "older universities".[3] Wengen's Curling Club was established in 1911.[1] The first ski races were held in the early 1920s with the British downhill championship held in 1921; the following year a ski race was held between Oxford and Cambridge.[4] These events were the first to have downhill races as opposed to Nordic races, which were held in other Swiss resorts. In Wengen, skiers requested use of the train system for access to the slopes; for some years trains were the earliest ski-lifts in the area.[5] Arnold Lunn used the natural terrain of the mountains for the courses; the downhill event followed the slopes above Wengen and was called the "straight down": skiers went straight down the mountain. Also during this period, Lunn invented, and introduced in Wengen, the first slalom race, in which skiers followed the terrain through the trees, replaced with ski gates in later years. These events are considered the birth of modern ski racing and Alpine skiing.[6] From August 1944 to the end of World War II, Wengen served as a sort of open-air internment camp for allied prisoners, mostly US bomber crews. Since the only practical way in or out of Wengen was via the cog railway, it was difficult for internees to escape.
12
personas locales recomiendan
Wengen
12
personas locales recomiendan
Wengen was first mentioned in official documents 751 years ago in 1268, and the origin of the name is unknown. Primarily an alpine farming community, the village began to be visited by tourists in the early 19th century. Mary and Percy Bysshe Shelley's History of a Six Weeks' Tour and Byron's Manfred, in which the scenery of the area is described, were published in 1817. This literature became the advent of the modern tourism industry for the village.[1] Felix Mendelssohn, to whom there is a memorial above the village, also visited in the early nineteenth century. Guesthouses and hotels began to be built in the mid-19th century, with the opening of the Launerhaus in 1859, with accommodation for 30 guests, and in 1880 the Pension Wengen was available to 100 guests.[1] The building and opening of the Wengernalpbahn in the 1890s made the village more accessible to tourists who previously had to walk up the steep slopes to the alpine village, opening the area for an expansion of tourism and the beginning of the ski industry.[2] In the early 20th century, British tourists started ski-clubs in the area, beginning in the nearby village of Mürren. By 1903 Wengen had an Anglican Church and two years later, Sir Henry Lunn formed the Public Schools Alpine Sports Club with Wengen as a destination ski area for the members.[1] A British Methodist minister, Lunn first visited the area to organize a meeting of Protestant churches in nearby Grindelwald where he learned about winter sports such as skiing. He returned to the area in 1896 with his son Arnold, who quickly learned to ski, and both father and son realized the potential in the future of winter sports. The club was established a few years later. Members of the Public Schools Alpine Sports Club were required to have attended an English public school or one of the "older universities".[3] Wengen's Curling Club was established in 1911.[1] The first ski races were held in the early 1920s with the British downhill championship held in 1921; the following year a ski race was held between Oxford and Cambridge.[4] These events were the first to have downhill races as opposed to Nordic races, which were held in other Swiss resorts. In Wengen, skiers requested use of the train system for access to the slopes; for some years trains were the earliest ski-lifts in the area.[5] Arnold Lunn used the natural terrain of the mountains for the courses; the downhill event followed the slopes above Wengen and was called the "straight down": skiers went straight down the mountain. Also during this period, Lunn invented, and introduced in Wengen, the first slalom race, in which skiers followed the terrain through the trees, replaced with ski gates in later years. These events are considered the birth of modern ski racing and Alpine skiing.[6] From August 1944 to the end of World War II, Wengen served as a sort of open-air internment camp for allied prisoners, mostly US bomber crews. Since the only practical way in or out of Wengen was via the cog railway, it was difficult for internees to escape.
Lauterbrunnen lies at the bottom of a U-shaped valley that extends south and then south-westwards from the village to meet the 8 kilometers (5.0 mi) Lauterbrunnen Wall. The Lauterbrunnen Valley (Lauterbrunnental) is one of the deepest in the Alpine chain when compared with the height of the mountains that rise directly on either side. It is a true cleft, rarely more than one kilometre in width, between limestones precipices, sometimes quite perpendicular, everywhere of extreme steepness. It is to this form of the valley that it owes the numerous waterfalls from which it derives its name. The streams descending from the adjoining mountains, on reaching the verge of the rocky walls of the valley, form cascades so high that they are almost lost in spray before they reach the level of the valley. The most famous of these are the Staubbach Fall, less than one kilometre from the village of Lauterbrunnen. The height of the cascade is between 800 and 900 feet (240 and 270 m), one of the highest in Europe formed of a single unbroken fall.[5] The river Weisse Lütschine flows through Lauterbrunnen and overflows its banks about once a year. The source of the river comes from melting snow high in the mountains, thus making it a very pure and clean source of water. It is common practice in the camp sites to chill drinks in the water. Trummelbach Falls is 3 km (1.9 mi) from Lauterbrunnen, connected by bus from the station.[6] The municipality of Lauterbrunnen extends a considerable distance beyond the village and valley, with an area of 164.51 km2 (63.52 sq mi). It reaches as far as the peaks of the Eiger, Mönch and Jungfrau to the east, the Gletscherhorn, Mittaghorn, Grosshorn, Breithorn and Tschingelhorn to the south, and the Gspaltenhorn and Schilthorn to the west. The Kleine Scheidegg Pass crosses over to Grindelwald to the east, whilst the Sefinenfurgge Pass crosses to Griesalp and Reichenbach im Kandertal to the west; both passes carry hiking trails that form part of the Alpine Pass Route, a long-distance hiking trail across Switzerland between Sargans and Montreux. Besides the village of Lauterbrunnen, the municipality also includes the villages of Wengen, Mürren, Gimmelwald, Stechelberg, and Isenfluh.[7][8][9]
26
personas locales recomiendan
Lauterbrunnen
26
personas locales recomiendan
Lauterbrunnen lies at the bottom of a U-shaped valley that extends south and then south-westwards from the village to meet the 8 kilometers (5.0 mi) Lauterbrunnen Wall. The Lauterbrunnen Valley (Lauterbrunnental) is one of the deepest in the Alpine chain when compared with the height of the mountains that rise directly on either side. It is a true cleft, rarely more than one kilometre in width, between limestones precipices, sometimes quite perpendicular, everywhere of extreme steepness. It is to this form of the valley that it owes the numerous waterfalls from which it derives its name. The streams descending from the adjoining mountains, on reaching the verge of the rocky walls of the valley, form cascades so high that they are almost lost in spray before they reach the level of the valley. The most famous of these are the Staubbach Fall, less than one kilometre from the village of Lauterbrunnen. The height of the cascade is between 800 and 900 feet (240 and 270 m), one of the highest in Europe formed of a single unbroken fall.[5] The river Weisse Lütschine flows through Lauterbrunnen and overflows its banks about once a year. The source of the river comes from melting snow high in the mountains, thus making it a very pure and clean source of water. It is common practice in the camp sites to chill drinks in the water. Trummelbach Falls is 3 km (1.9 mi) from Lauterbrunnen, connected by bus from the station.[6] The municipality of Lauterbrunnen extends a considerable distance beyond the village and valley, with an area of 164.51 km2 (63.52 sq mi). It reaches as far as the peaks of the Eiger, Mönch and Jungfrau to the east, the Gletscherhorn, Mittaghorn, Grosshorn, Breithorn and Tschingelhorn to the south, and the Gspaltenhorn and Schilthorn to the west. The Kleine Scheidegg Pass crosses over to Grindelwald to the east, whilst the Sefinenfurgge Pass crosses to Griesalp and Reichenbach im Kandertal to the west; both passes carry hiking trails that form part of the Alpine Pass Route, a long-distance hiking trail across Switzerland between Sargans and Montreux. Besides the village of Lauterbrunnen, the municipality also includes the villages of Wengen, Mürren, Gimmelwald, Stechelberg, and Isenfluh.[7][8][9]
The city of Thun, which is located at the lower end of Lake Thun, is the gate to the Bernese Oberland. The historic Old Town is situated about one kilometer from the shore of the lake, on the river Aare. There is a castle in the center of the Old Town that dates back to the 12th century and boasts a museum. The first settlement arose on today's site of the city as early as 2,500 BC. The mighty castle was constructed by the Dukes of Zähringen. It has a fortification tower built between 1180 and 1190. The halls of the tower house a historical museum that exhibits artifacts from prehistory and early history as well as medieval objects, weapons and uniforms from the 18th and 19th century. The castle's most splendid exhibit is the restored Knights Hall, dating to the 12th century. Further sights in the Old Town include the town church with its tower dating back to about 1330, the town hall from the 16th century, the Old Town itself and the numerous restaurants and cafés along the Aare River. Winter The Eiger, Mönch and Jungfrau rise majestically across Lake Thun, over which glides a historic paddle steamer. The castle and city church proudly dominate the late-medieval Old Town. Summer The Eiger, Mönch and Jungfrau rise majestically across Lake Thun, over which glides a historic paddle steamer. The castle and city church proudly dominate the late-medieval Old Town. News The news listed here is maintained by the regional / local tourist offices, which is why Switzerland Tourism can not guarantee the content. GUIDED TOUR OF THE OLD TOWN Discover Thun with us! Come on a guided tour through the Thun Old Town and solve the riddle of this Zähringer town. Thun is fascinating - its culture has a wealth of tradition, its history goes back to the stone age, and its unique setting between the lake and the Alps has left its mark on the historic and modern townscape. Come and discover Thun with us!
73
personas locales recomiendan
Thun
73
personas locales recomiendan
The city of Thun, which is located at the lower end of Lake Thun, is the gate to the Bernese Oberland. The historic Old Town is situated about one kilometer from the shore of the lake, on the river Aare. There is a castle in the center of the Old Town that dates back to the 12th century and boasts a museum. The first settlement arose on today's site of the city as early as 2,500 BC. The mighty castle was constructed by the Dukes of Zähringen. It has a fortification tower built between 1180 and 1190. The halls of the tower house a historical museum that exhibits artifacts from prehistory and early history as well as medieval objects, weapons and uniforms from the 18th and 19th century. The castle's most splendid exhibit is the restored Knights Hall, dating to the 12th century. Further sights in the Old Town include the town church with its tower dating back to about 1330, the town hall from the 16th century, the Old Town itself and the numerous restaurants and cafés along the Aare River. Winter The Eiger, Mönch and Jungfrau rise majestically across Lake Thun, over which glides a historic paddle steamer. The castle and city church proudly dominate the late-medieval Old Town. Summer The Eiger, Mönch and Jungfrau rise majestically across Lake Thun, over which glides a historic paddle steamer. The castle and city church proudly dominate the late-medieval Old Town. News The news listed here is maintained by the regional / local tourist offices, which is why Switzerland Tourism can not guarantee the content. GUIDED TOUR OF THE OLD TOWN Discover Thun with us! Come on a guided tour through the Thun Old Town and solve the riddle of this Zähringer town. Thun is fascinating - its culture has a wealth of tradition, its history goes back to the stone age, and its unique setting between the lake and the Alps has left its mark on the historic and modern townscape. Come and discover Thun with us!
Interlaken is a fantastic base for seeing the best of central Switzerland's magnificent scenery while enjoying the comforts of a chic lakeside resort. Tourist attractions are all around it, with boat tours on Lakes Thun and Brienz at either side of the town and thrilling train and funicular rides to the spectacular surrounding mountain peaks. Interlaken is one of the oldest, best known, and most popular summer holiday resorts in Switzerland. The first visitors arrived in the 17th century, and as transport facilities improved with the coming of the railroad, boat services on the lakes, and most recently the expressway, Interlaken became the major tourist center of the Bernese Oberland. Day or night, you'll find plenty of things to do in and around Interlaken. Along with the almost endless variety of walks, climbs, and outdoor excursions, there are many other sports available for active travelers. On the right bank of the Aare, opposite the Kursaal, is a swimming pool, and visitors will find a golf course in Unterseen, as well as sailing and windsurfing on the lakes,
11
personas locales recomiendan
Interlaken
11
personas locales recomiendan
Interlaken is a fantastic base for seeing the best of central Switzerland's magnificent scenery while enjoying the comforts of a chic lakeside resort. Tourist attractions are all around it, with boat tours on Lakes Thun and Brienz at either side of the town and thrilling train and funicular rides to the spectacular surrounding mountain peaks. Interlaken is one of the oldest, best known, and most popular summer holiday resorts in Switzerland. The first visitors arrived in the 17th century, and as transport facilities improved with the coming of the railroad, boat services on the lakes, and most recently the expressway, Interlaken became the major tourist center of the Bernese Oberland. Day or night, you'll find plenty of things to do in and around Interlaken. Along with the almost endless variety of walks, climbs, and outdoor excursions, there are many other sports available for active travelers. On the right bank of the Aare, opposite the Kursaal, is a swimming pool, and visitors will find a golf course in Unterseen, as well as sailing and windsurfing on the lakes,
The views over Interlaken and both lakes from the Harder are spectacular. Beyond the bridge over the Aare River, next to the Harder Alpine Wildlife Park, the Harder-Kulm funicular climbs at a 64-degree gradient up the Harder to an altitude of 1,322 meters. From the Art Nouveau-style Panorama Restaurant at its top are magnificent views of the Jungfrau area, Interlaken, and the lakes. You can return along forest paths via the Hardermannli lookout pavilion at 1,116 meters and the Hohbühl pavilion, where there is a memorial to the composers Mendelssohn, Wagner, and Weber. Stop at the Harder Alpine Wildlife Park to see marmots and ibexes. The latter, once a common denizen of the Alps, had become extinct in Switzerland by the early 1900s. This park was created to re-introduce the ibex, and the breeding was so successful that within a few years they were able to begin reintroducing these beautiful creatures into the wild.
15
personas locales recomiendan
Harder Kulm
15
personas locales recomiendan
The views over Interlaken and both lakes from the Harder are spectacular. Beyond the bridge over the Aare River, next to the Harder Alpine Wildlife Park, the Harder-Kulm funicular climbs at a 64-degree gradient up the Harder to an altitude of 1,322 meters. From the Art Nouveau-style Panorama Restaurant at its top are magnificent views of the Jungfrau area, Interlaken, and the lakes. You can return along forest paths via the Hardermannli lookout pavilion at 1,116 meters and the Hohbühl pavilion, where there is a memorial to the composers Mendelssohn, Wagner, and Weber. Stop at the Harder Alpine Wildlife Park to see marmots and ibexes. The latter, once a common denizen of the Alps, had become extinct in Switzerland by the early 1900s. This park was created to re-introduce the ibex, and the breeding was so successful that within a few years they were able to begin reintroducing these beautiful creatures into the wild.
An area of 14 hectares in the heart of Interlaken that belonged to the Augustinian convent was acquired in 1860 by a group of 37 hotel owners and private citizens to be left as an open space, a remarkable example of farseeing town planning. Through its length runs the Höheweg, a splendid avenue between the east and west rail stations that affords a magnificent view of the Jungfrau, surrounded by hotels and flower-beds. Alongside it is the Kursaal, with a theater and a café and beautiful gardens with a flower clock, as well as a number of hotels, including the 150-year-old Victoria Jungfrau Hotel, itself a local landmark. Next to the Hotel Interlaken, you'll find the small Garden of Friendship, the first Japanese garden in Switzerland, a peaceful spot with flowering plants, water, and koi carp.
Höhematte
An area of 14 hectares in the heart of Interlaken that belonged to the Augustinian convent was acquired in 1860 by a group of 37 hotel owners and private citizens to be left as an open space, a remarkable example of farseeing town planning. Through its length runs the Höheweg, a splendid avenue between the east and west rail stations that affords a magnificent view of the Jungfrau, surrounded by hotels and flower-beds. Alongside it is the Kursaal, with a theater and a café and beautiful gardens with a flower clock, as well as a number of hotels, including the 150-year-old Victoria Jungfrau Hotel, itself a local landmark. Next to the Hotel Interlaken, you'll find the small Garden of Friendship, the first Japanese garden in Switzerland, a peaceful spot with flowering plants, water, and koi carp.
From Wilderswil, a five-minute walk from the Interlaken Ost railway station, you can take a rack-railroad that has been carrying sightseers up to the Schynige Platte since it opened in 1893. The hour-long ride is a series of ever-changing Alpine panoramas, and at the top, you'll find one of the finest panoramic views of the Alps, encompassing the Eiger, Mönch, and Jungfrau peaks as well as Lake Thun. You can enjoy these from a 45-minute panoramic walk along an easy trail, which also leads to an excellent alpine garden with 600 species of flowers and high-altitude plants. If you're lucky there may be locals playing traditional Swiss Alphorns at the Schynige Platte station.
10
personas locales recomiendan
Schynige Platte
10
personas locales recomiendan
From Wilderswil, a five-minute walk from the Interlaken Ost railway station, you can take a rack-railroad that has been carrying sightseers up to the Schynige Platte since it opened in 1893. The hour-long ride is a series of ever-changing Alpine panoramas, and at the top, you'll find one of the finest panoramic views of the Alps, encompassing the Eiger, Mönch, and Jungfrau peaks as well as Lake Thun. You can enjoy these from a 45-minute panoramic walk along an easy trail, which also leads to an excellent alpine garden with 600 species of flowers and high-altitude plants. If you're lucky there may be locals playing traditional Swiss Alphorns at the Schynige Platte station.
The Marktgasse runs northwest from the Interlaken post office and across the Spielmatten islands and the river to the little hamlet of Unterseen, at the foot of Mt. Harder. This is one of several villages that form Interlaken, and in this old part of town is the 1471 parish church, with a Late Gothic tower. Here, you'll find some beautiful wooden chalets of the kind you'd expect to see in tiny mountain villages, not in a busy resort center like Interlaken. Set in green gardens, these may even have farm animals grazing on the lawns. Small restaurants around the pretty Stadthausplatz serve traditional Swiss dishes.
7
personas locales recomiendan
Unterseen
7
personas locales recomiendan
The Marktgasse runs northwest from the Interlaken post office and across the Spielmatten islands and the river to the little hamlet of Unterseen, at the foot of Mt. Harder. This is one of several villages that form Interlaken, and in this old part of town is the 1471 parish church, with a Late Gothic tower. Here, you'll find some beautiful wooden chalets of the kind you'd expect to see in tiny mountain villages, not in a busy resort center like Interlaken. Set in green gardens, these may even have farm animals grazing on the lawns. Small restaurants around the pretty Stadthausplatz serve traditional Swiss dishes.
More than one kilometer of walkways lead through the chambers and passageways of these hillside caves, where legend holds that a dragon took shelter when hunted by the monk, Beatus, whose hermitage was nearby. But the geology is no legend, and you can tour these underground caverns to see mirror lakes, underground waterfalls, stalactites, and stalagmites accompanied by a guide or at your own speed using a descriptive app. The entire area is quite beautiful, with a series of waterfalls cascading down the cliffs. You can get here by bus from Interlaken (it's about a 10-minute walk from the bus stop) or by boat from Interlaken West station, but it's quite a steep climb from the lake to the caves. Address: Sundlauenen, Interlaken
20
personas locales recomiendan
Cuevas de San Beato
20
personas locales recomiendan
More than one kilometer of walkways lead through the chambers and passageways of these hillside caves, where legend holds that a dragon took shelter when hunted by the monk, Beatus, whose hermitage was nearby. But the geology is no legend, and you can tour these underground caverns to see mirror lakes, underground waterfalls, stalactites, and stalagmites accompanied by a guide or at your own speed using a descriptive app. The entire area is quite beautiful, with a series of waterfalls cascading down the cliffs. You can get here by bus from Interlaken (it's about a 10-minute walk from the bus stop) or by boat from Interlaken West station, but it's quite a steep climb from the lake to the caves. Address: Sundlauenen, Interlaken
Grindelwald in Switzerland (in the Bernese Oberland region) is a large resort with 30 lifts (10 chair lifts, 13 surface lifts) that offers skiers an incredible 1528 metres (5013 feet) of vertical descent. Grindelwald has 125 acres of terrain over 51 pistes with a total length of 157 kilometers (98 miles). Grindelwald is best suited to intermediate skiers and snowboarders with some terrain for beginners but little of interest for advanced skiers. There are 20 kilometers (12 miles) of cross country ski trails at Grindelwald. For snowboarders, there is a terrain park and 5 half pipes. About one quarter of the pistes at Grindelwald are covered by snowmaking. The nearest airport is at Bern / Berne and the nearest train station to Grindelwald is at Grindelwald. There is accommodation located close to the pistes but we would welcome additional information about any hotels or chalets in Grindelwald.
33
personas locales recomiendan
Grindelwald
33
personas locales recomiendan
Grindelwald in Switzerland (in the Bernese Oberland region) is a large resort with 30 lifts (10 chair lifts, 13 surface lifts) that offers skiers an incredible 1528 metres (5013 feet) of vertical descent. Grindelwald has 125 acres of terrain over 51 pistes with a total length of 157 kilometers (98 miles). Grindelwald is best suited to intermediate skiers and snowboarders with some terrain for beginners but little of interest for advanced skiers. There are 20 kilometers (12 miles) of cross country ski trails at Grindelwald. For snowboarders, there is a terrain park and 5 half pipes. About one quarter of the pistes at Grindelwald are covered by snowmaking. The nearest airport is at Bern / Berne and the nearest train station to Grindelwald is at Grindelwald. There is accommodation located close to the pistes but we would welcome additional information about any hotels or chalets in Grindelwald.
Cena gastronómica
Kilchberg, October 15, 2019 – The Swiss premium chocolate brand LINDT & SPRUNGLI makes a bold move in the Chinese market by launching a new campaign featuring world-class tennis champion Roger Federer and popular Chinese actress Xin Zhilei. As one of the greatest tennis players in history, Roger Federer symbolizes the Swiss perfection and, as a professional actress, Xin Zhilei masters in her every role with passion and dedication. Together, they represent LINDT’s core values of quality and premium, and open the world’s door of premium Swiss chocolate to Chinese consumers. The first video launch achieved an astonishing 12 million views in less than 1 hour. CHOCOLADEFABRIKEN LINDT & SPRÜNGLI AG Seestrasse 204, 8802 Kilchberg Switzerland
Lindt Chocolate Shop Kilchberg
58 Pilgerweg
Kilchberg, October 15, 2019 – The Swiss premium chocolate brand LINDT & SPRUNGLI makes a bold move in the Chinese market by launching a new campaign featuring world-class tennis champion Roger Federer and popular Chinese actress Xin Zhilei. As one of the greatest tennis players in history, Roger Federer symbolizes the Swiss perfection and, as a professional actress, Xin Zhilei masters in her every role with passion and dedication. Together, they represent LINDT’s core values of quality and premium, and open the world’s door of premium Swiss chocolate to Chinese consumers. The first video launch achieved an astonishing 12 million views in less than 1 hour. CHOCOLADEFABRIKEN LINDT & SPRÜNGLI AG Seestrasse 204, 8802 Kilchberg Switzerland
La Maison du Gruyère is a village cheese dairy providing the opportunity of viewing the hand-made production of the cheese "Le Gruyère AOP" and much more… Do you know the history, century-old expertise and the different production stages of a Gruyère AOP? The specifications, with their quality and traceability requirements? The ageing periods and the cellar treatment during its minimum 5 months of ripening? The interactive display « Gruyère AOP, a journey to the heart of the senses » plays on the five senses to plunge visitors into the world of Gruyère AOP and reveal all its secrets. Thanks to his dexterity and experience, the cheesemaker imparts to Gruyère AOP its particular character and individuality. Between 9:00 am and 11:00 am or 12:30 pm and 2:30 pm, the high point is of course the opportunity of observing the expertise of the cheesemakers. A tip: between 9:00 and 10:15 am all the principal phases can be observed on several vats, or at 9:55 am and 11:00 am or 2:25 pm, the draining and placing in the moulds. The visit, lasting some 30 to 45 minutes, takes place with headphones, and it’s in the company of the friendly cow « Cerise » that one explores the world of Gruyère AOP. The audio information is available in thirteen languages and written translations are also provided in eight languages. The Restaurant of La Maison du Gruyère offers the opportunity of prolonging the experience in tasting numerous dishes with Gruyère AOP as well as typical local dishes. Le Marché gruérien (Gruyère Market) features the products of our cheesemakers, local products, crafts and souvenirs.
11
personas locales recomiendan
La Maison du Gruyère
3 Place de la Gare
11
personas locales recomiendan
La Maison du Gruyère is a village cheese dairy providing the opportunity of viewing the hand-made production of the cheese "Le Gruyère AOP" and much more… Do you know the history, century-old expertise and the different production stages of a Gruyère AOP? The specifications, with their quality and traceability requirements? The ageing periods and the cellar treatment during its minimum 5 months of ripening? The interactive display « Gruyère AOP, a journey to the heart of the senses » plays on the five senses to plunge visitors into the world of Gruyère AOP and reveal all its secrets. Thanks to his dexterity and experience, the cheesemaker imparts to Gruyère AOP its particular character and individuality. Between 9:00 am and 11:00 am or 12:30 pm and 2:30 pm, the high point is of course the opportunity of observing the expertise of the cheesemakers. A tip: between 9:00 and 10:15 am all the principal phases can be observed on several vats, or at 9:55 am and 11:00 am or 2:25 pm, the draining and placing in the moulds. The visit, lasting some 30 to 45 minutes, takes place with headphones, and it’s in the company of the friendly cow « Cerise » that one explores the world of Gruyère AOP. The audio information is available in thirteen languages and written translations are also provided in eight languages. The Restaurant of La Maison du Gruyère offers the opportunity of prolonging the experience in tasting numerous dishes with Gruyère AOP as well as typical local dishes. Le Marché gruérien (Gruyère Market) features the products of our cheesemakers, local products, crafts and souvenirs.
Mürren is a very special place Mürren is one of those picture perfect villages in the Swiss Alps: there are no cars, mountains all around, and green slopes and forests. You'll find many hiking trails here. In winter, there are many options for skiing, snowboarding and tobogganing. The Jungfrau region offers more than 200 km of pistes. Wengen, on the other side of the valley, offers a similar, but not identical experience. Like many popular villages, Mürren is pretty touristy, but not in a disturbing way. It is one of the best places to enjoy the Swiss Alps, away from traffic, shopping centers and other distractions. There are quite some hotels and restaurants. There aren't many shops, but it's enough for all the basic needs: you'll find a supermarket there, as well as various sports shops and a bakery. Murren is a charming village with magnificent views and no traffic noise. It is perched on a shelf of Alpine pasture forming a balcony overlooking the steep cleft of the Lauterbrunnen Valley. Destinations like Murren are hard to find – alpine scenery, mountain culture, and exciting activities! It is a great place for hiking enthusiasts who wish to enjoy the natural beauty of Switzerland. And in winter you will find skiing for all levels. Murren is the highest altitude ski resort in the Bernese Oberland and faces a series of giant peaks carved out of rock or ice: from left to right the view encompasses the Eiger, the Monch, the Jungfrau, the Breithorn and the Gspaltenhorn range. Book your Murren, Switzerland vacation to experience one of the most beautiful places in Switzerland! This beautiful village is completely cut off from car traffic, and the sporting character account for the popularity of the resort. Being car free will make for an exceptional vacation that will create long lasting memories. From Murren a cable car takes its breathtaking ride up to the Mt. Schilthorn summit. From up there you can enjoy exceptional panoramic views and sip cocktails in the revolving Piz Gloria summit restaurant. Mt. Schilthorn was featured in the James Bond film "On Her Majesty's Secret Service" and is also referred to as the James Bond Mountain. The development of tourism in the area was largely due to the British, who came here at the turn of the century to indulge in their favorite winter sports and who succeeded in recreating a cozy, congenial atmosphere that reminded them of England. It was Murren that the Kandahar Ski Club was founded in 1924; it was to lead to the famous Arlberg-Kandahar competition, which is now regarded as the unofficial world championship of the Alpine countries. Attractions and Activities Discover Murren Murren is an ideal place for travelers that wish to enjoy the natural beauties of Switzerland. It is a unique village on a sunny terrace, a hiker’s paradise and great for winter sports. We are presenting you just a few of the many activities that are possible on your vacation to Murren, Switzerland and its surroundings.
14
personas locales recomiendan
Mürren
14
personas locales recomiendan
Mürren is a very special place Mürren is one of those picture perfect villages in the Swiss Alps: there are no cars, mountains all around, and green slopes and forests. You'll find many hiking trails here. In winter, there are many options for skiing, snowboarding and tobogganing. The Jungfrau region offers more than 200 km of pistes. Wengen, on the other side of the valley, offers a similar, but not identical experience. Like many popular villages, Mürren is pretty touristy, but not in a disturbing way. It is one of the best places to enjoy the Swiss Alps, away from traffic, shopping centers and other distractions. There are quite some hotels and restaurants. There aren't many shops, but it's enough for all the basic needs: you'll find a supermarket there, as well as various sports shops and a bakery. Murren is a charming village with magnificent views and no traffic noise. It is perched on a shelf of Alpine pasture forming a balcony overlooking the steep cleft of the Lauterbrunnen Valley. Destinations like Murren are hard to find – alpine scenery, mountain culture, and exciting activities! It is a great place for hiking enthusiasts who wish to enjoy the natural beauty of Switzerland. And in winter you will find skiing for all levels. Murren is the highest altitude ski resort in the Bernese Oberland and faces a series of giant peaks carved out of rock or ice: from left to right the view encompasses the Eiger, the Monch, the Jungfrau, the Breithorn and the Gspaltenhorn range. Book your Murren, Switzerland vacation to experience one of the most beautiful places in Switzerland! This beautiful village is completely cut off from car traffic, and the sporting character account for the popularity of the resort. Being car free will make for an exceptional vacation that will create long lasting memories. From Murren a cable car takes its breathtaking ride up to the Mt. Schilthorn summit. From up there you can enjoy exceptional panoramic views and sip cocktails in the revolving Piz Gloria summit restaurant. Mt. Schilthorn was featured in the James Bond film "On Her Majesty's Secret Service" and is also referred to as the James Bond Mountain. The development of tourism in the area was largely due to the British, who came here at the turn of the century to indulge in their favorite winter sports and who succeeded in recreating a cozy, congenial atmosphere that reminded them of England. It was Murren that the Kandahar Ski Club was founded in 1924; it was to lead to the famous Arlberg-Kandahar competition, which is now regarded as the unofficial world championship of the Alpine countries. Attractions and Activities Discover Murren Murren is an ideal place for travelers that wish to enjoy the natural beauties of Switzerland. It is a unique village on a sunny terrace, a hiker’s paradise and great for winter sports. We are presenting you just a few of the many activities that are possible on your vacation to Murren, Switzerland and its surroundings.