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Guidebook for Sarajevo

Tihana

Guidebook for Sarajevo

Food Scene - Places to eat local food
Traditional Bosnian food shares similarities with Turkish and Mediterranean cuisine, a legacy of 400 years of Ottoman rule. Typical dishes include organic meat, usually lamb or beef to meet Halal requirements, slow-cooked in their juices with a seasoning of spices. Meals tend to be light with a generous portion of vegetables. Here are ten delicious dishes for you to try on your next visit. 1. Cevapi Cevapi are small, oblong-shaped kebabs from lamb and beef served in somun (Bosnian pita bread) with raw onions. Locals eat this for lunch, dinner, or as a snack. Chefs grill the meat and serve between five to ten individual kebabs on a plate with a sour cream sauce. Each restaurant cooks and seasons in a different way, making each cevapi slightly different. You can also find regional variances that use mutton or lamb. 2. Burek The Burek comes from Turkey brought to the Balkans by the Ottoman. Bureks have a flaky pastry with a meat, cheese, or spinach filling. Almost every bakery in the country sells this greasy snack, which is sometimes sold individually or by weight. Bosnians and tourists tend to have a love-hate relationship with it. On the one hand, a delicious and filling snack, on the other, they’re very greasy and full of fat. 3. Begova Corba Begova Corba, or Bey’s Soup in English, was an Ottoman favorite. Slow-cooked chicken and vegetables such as carrots, potatoes and celery, boil into a thick, creamy stew making a warm appetizer. Bey’s is often served with a sour cream or sauce in a clay bowl and locals cook and eat this soup especially during holidays and festivities. 4. Klepe (Bosnian minced meat dumplings) The Balkans are great at dumplings, Klepe being the Bosnian version. Imagine a dough stuffed with either tangy cheese or meat (lamb or beef) before being steamed to create a soft ravioli-like texture. Klepe comes with a yoghurt or garlic sauce and almost melts in the mouth. 5. Dolma Dolma is another dish found around the Balkans and Mediterranean, Bosnia adds its own delicious twist. Vegetables, such as eggplant, peppers and zucchini, are stuffed with either meat or rice and seasoning. Bosnians serve meat dolma warm, often with a lemon-based sauce and rice dolma at room temperature with a yoghurt-based garlic sauce. In Mostar, a regional speciality is the Sogan Dolma using an onion as the base vegetable. 6. Bosnian bean soup Imagine a warm soup with soft beans in a clay bowl on a chilly winter’s day. Grah is a traditional Bosnian bean soup using Peruano beans as the main ingredients, served alongside bell peppers, onions and carrots. Often slow-cooked beef is added to the soup, creating a healthy warm meal for even the coldest of days. 7. Bosanski Lonac Bosanski Lonac is said to be one of the national dishes. The stew is unique to Bosnia and uses a particular way to prepare the meal. Cooks put large chunks of both meat and vegetables in alternating layers until the pot is full. After simmering and cooking for what may feel like forever, the delicious broth and stew comes as a hearty meal. 8. Tufahija The Ottomans liked their sweet desserts and introduced Tufahija to Bosnia. An apple boiled in sugar and stuffed with walnuts is served with its syrup and whipped cream in a large glass. Super sweet Tufahija complements the strong, bitter taste of Bosnian coffee and locals tend to enjoy both at the same time. 9. Ustipci Every Ustipci is different. Arguably the most delicious treat in Bosnia is Ustipci, or small balls of fried dough with either a sweet or savoury filling. Recipes pass from generation to generation making each version slightly different to the next. Sweet ones use jam or honey while their savoury counterparts have cheese or meat. As you eat the small, crispy and somewhat greasy snack, you’ll notice a soft bread texture when biting down and an explosion of flavour as the contents burst into your mouth. Locals often snack on this with tea or coffee. 10. Baklava Baklava, found across the Balkans and Caucasus, is a dessert treat made from sheets of filo pastry. Bosnian Baklava looks a bit like a small cake with layers of nuts, syrup and honey. As the Ottomans expanded their Empire, they brought this favourite sweet, which has now evolved into Bosnia’s own. The high sugar content and sweet flavour make this a perfect side to go with your coffee.
Amazing view, lovely traditional food, nice and big garden. During the evening, restaurant has live Bosnian traditional music.
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Park Prinčeva
7 Iza Hrida
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Amazing view, lovely traditional food, nice and big garden. During the evening, restaurant has live Bosnian traditional music.
Very classy restaurant and fine dinning (traditional Bosnian) with amazing view.
Kod Kibeta
bb Trećeg bataljona
Very classy restaurant and fine dinning (traditional Bosnian) with amazing view.
Amazing place with local and Regional food. All organically produced. Cozy place with lovely interior.
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Dveri
12 Prote Bakovića
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Amazing place with local and Regional food. All organically produced. Cozy place with lovely interior.
Balkantina is the unique gastro-cultural agency and tour operator launched in 2016 in Sarajevo by the small team of foodies that wanted to reveal and share the hidden culinary and cultural treasures in the off-the-beaten-path areas of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina and the whole Balkan region. There are passionate about, and which every person needs on holiday: food! Besides learning about the history, culture, architecture during our events, city tours, day trips and multi-country trips we at Balkantina designed the offerings to let their guests taste local gastronomy and learn how to cook local dishes.
Balkantina
5 Pehlivanuša
Balkantina is the unique gastro-cultural agency and tour operator launched in 2016 in Sarajevo by the small team of foodies that wanted to reveal and share the hidden culinary and cultural treasures in the off-the-beaten-path areas of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina and the whole Balkan region. There are passionate about, and which every person needs on holiday: food! Besides learning about the history, culture, architecture during our events, city tours, day trips and multi-country trips we at Balkantina designed the offerings to let their guests taste local gastronomy and learn how to cook local dishes.
Sarajevo has a rich tradition of café culture thanks to its Ottoman heritage. Traditional Bosnian coffee is thick and strong, and is usually served with Turkish delight in classic eastern copperware. Bosnia’s capital city has plenty of places to take a rest and indulge in this Balkan speciality.
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Art kuća sevdaha
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Sarajevo has a rich tradition of café culture thanks to its Ottoman heritage. Traditional Bosnian coffee is thick and strong, and is usually served with Turkish delight in classic eastern copperware. Bosnia’s capital city has plenty of places to take a rest and indulge in this Balkan speciality.
Best Burkek (pie) in Sarajevo !!
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Buregdžinica Bosna
11 Bravadžiluk
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Best Burkek (pie) in Sarajevo !!
Ćevabdžinica "Zmaj 2"
Sightseeing
When the idea of building a tunnel under the runway of Sarajevo airport was born, in order to connect the besieged Sarajevo with the rest of Bosnian territory, it seemed to be a very strange idea to many people. However, these were times when everything was more than strange. The city found itself by the end of the 20th century in the classic medieval siege. In military theory is just for that period, namely the early Medieval Ages, characteristic the emergence of the tunnels as fortified buildings. Often during this period the tunnel was considered to be the decisive factor in the achievement of war aims. Also in the recent history of warfare we encounter tunnels that were dug for different purposes. The tunnels have been used in the First and Second World War. And today, on the British island of Jersey, there is a whole underground complex known as "the Jersey War Tunnels" and similar complex you can visit in Gibraltar. The tunnels were used by the Vietnamese, a similar model of underground communication is used by some armed groups in the Middle East. The tunnels have played a particularly important role in Beirut. Palestinians have their own tunnels in Gaza that connect them with Egypt. Especially interesting were the tunnels that were dug during the Cold War in Berlin. It is assumed that under the Berlin today there are about 30 tunnels that were used to escape from East to West Berlin, and that a dozen of them served the purpose. In addition to ordinary people in Berlin spies were also digging tunnels and the most famous tunnel of this kind was the American-British project worth about $ 30 million, which was supposed to link a US radar to the Soviet telephone lines. By the end of the works the Soviets discovered it. Unlike all listed, the Sarajevo tunnel, from the idea to realization and primarily by function, was in many ways a unique facility of its kind in the world. That dug hole in the ground, approximately 800 meters long, with an average height of 1.6 meters and a width of 1 meter, reminded about everything else but the tunnel, but due its importance to the city and the country it became bigger than the La Manche itself. A breath of freedom is reached through a tunnel to the city that was choking and was enough to give people new strength for survival in the years of war that will follow. Because of the military, political, psychological significance and importance for the supply of the city that it had, it was the top kept secret - "a tunnel which is not, e.g. which does not exist".
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Sarajevo Tunnel
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When the idea of building a tunnel under the runway of Sarajevo airport was born, in order to connect the besieged Sarajevo with the rest of Bosnian territory, it seemed to be a very strange idea to many people. However, these were times when everything was more than strange. The city found itself by the end of the 20th century in the classic medieval siege. In military theory is just for that period, namely the early Medieval Ages, characteristic the emergence of the tunnels as fortified buildings. Often during this period the tunnel was considered to be the decisive factor in the achievement of war aims. Also in the recent history of warfare we encounter tunnels that were dug for different purposes. The tunnels have been used in the First and Second World War. And today, on the British island of Jersey, there is a whole underground complex known as "the Jersey War Tunnels" and similar complex you can visit in Gibraltar. The tunnels were used by the Vietnamese, a similar model of underground communication is used by some armed groups in the Middle East. The tunnels have played a particularly important role in Beirut. Palestinians have their own tunnels in Gaza that connect them with Egypt. Especially interesting were the tunnels that were dug during the Cold War in Berlin. It is assumed that under the Berlin today there are about 30 tunnels that were used to escape from East to West Berlin, and that a dozen of them served the purpose. In addition to ordinary people in Berlin spies were also digging tunnels and the most famous tunnel of this kind was the American-British project worth about $ 30 million, which was supposed to link a US radar to the Soviet telephone lines. By the end of the works the Soviets discovered it. Unlike all listed, the Sarajevo tunnel, from the idea to realization and primarily by function, was in many ways a unique facility of its kind in the world. That dug hole in the ground, approximately 800 meters long, with an average height of 1.6 meters and a width of 1 meter, reminded about everything else but the tunnel, but due its importance to the city and the country it became bigger than the La Manche itself. A breath of freedom is reached through a tunnel to the city that was choking and was enough to give people new strength for survival in the years of war that will follow. Because of the military, political, psychological significance and importance for the supply of the city that it had, it was the top kept secret - "a tunnel which is not, e.g. which does not exist".
Bascarsija is Sarajevo's old bazaar and the historical and cultural center of the city. Bascarsija was built in the 15th century when Isa-Beg Isakovic founded the town. The word Bascarsija derives from the Turkish language. The word "bas" which is "bas" in Turkish literally means "head", in some contexts however also "primary", "main", "capital" and "carsija" which is "carsi" in Turkish means "bazaar" or "market". Due to the large fire in the 19th century, today Bascarsija is half the size that it once was. Bascarsija is located on the north bank of the river Miljacka, in the municipality of Stari Grad. On Bascarsija there are several important historic buildings, such as the Gazi Husrev-beg Mosque and sahat-kula. Today Bascarsija is the major tourist attraction of Sarajevo.
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Baščaršija
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Bascarsija is Sarajevo's old bazaar and the historical and cultural center of the city. Bascarsija was built in the 15th century when Isa-Beg Isakovic founded the town. The word Bascarsija derives from the Turkish language. The word "bas" which is "bas" in Turkish literally means "head", in some contexts however also "primary", "main", "capital" and "carsija" which is "carsi" in Turkish means "bazaar" or "market". Due to the large fire in the 19th century, today Bascarsija is half the size that it once was. Bascarsija is located on the north bank of the river Miljacka, in the municipality of Stari Grad. On Bascarsija there are several important historic buildings, such as the Gazi Husrev-beg Mosque and sahat-kula. Today Bascarsija is the major tourist attraction of Sarajevo.
The Yellow Fortress is one of the fortifications that made up the defensive wall of the old town, Vratnik. Since it is positioned up on Jekovac Cliff, it is also known as Jekovac Fortress. Open For Visits: Yes Reservations: No Reservations needed Guided Tours Available: No After Eugene of Savoy sacked Sarajevo in 1697, it was shown that the little fortress, which was where the White Fortress is today, wasn’t sufficient to defend the city from attack, so the Bosnian Governor, Gazi Ahmed Pasha Rustempašić Skopljak, commissioned work on fortifying Vratnik in 1729. Five bastions were placed at points along the fortified wall, including the Yellow Fortress, which takes its name from the yellow rock that was used in its construction. The fortress lost its original function once the Austro-Hungarians took over Sarajevo. Today, it offers a fantastic view of the city and is one of Sarajevo’s most popular vantage points. This is also the spot where a cannon is fired at sunset during the Islamic month of Ramadan to mark the time for breaking the fast.
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Yellow Bastion
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The Yellow Fortress is one of the fortifications that made up the defensive wall of the old town, Vratnik. Since it is positioned up on Jekovac Cliff, it is also known as Jekovac Fortress. Open For Visits: Yes Reservations: No Reservations needed Guided Tours Available: No After Eugene of Savoy sacked Sarajevo in 1697, it was shown that the little fortress, which was where the White Fortress is today, wasn’t sufficient to defend the city from attack, so the Bosnian Governor, Gazi Ahmed Pasha Rustempašić Skopljak, commissioned work on fortifying Vratnik in 1729. Five bastions were placed at points along the fortified wall, including the Yellow Fortress, which takes its name from the yellow rock that was used in its construction. The fortress lost its original function once the Austro-Hungarians took over Sarajevo. Today, it offers a fantastic view of the city and is one of Sarajevo’s most popular vantage points. This is also the spot where a cannon is fired at sunset during the Islamic month of Ramadan to mark the time for breaking the fast.
Ali Pasha’s Mosque in Sarajevo is part of the vakuf (endowment) established by Hadim Ali Pasha, who was born in Sarajevo Field. He was raised in Istanbul, where he received his education, and later carried out his service in the Ottoman Army in both Bosnia and Buda. t is presumed that the mosque was built in 1560 or 1561 and it is considered one of the most harmonious and loveliest mosques to be built in the classical Ottoman style in BiH. The courtyard of the mosque contains Ali Pasha’s tomb, as well as the resting places for many other prominent Bosnians. The gravestones for the dervishes, Ajni Dede and Šemsi Dede, were moved to the courtyard, as both men had come to Sarajevo as members of the entourage for Sultan Mehmed II “the Conqueror”. The men were first interred in mausoleums across from the mosque, where the Hygienic Institute is located today. Their gravestones are counted among the oldest monuments from Ottoman Sarajevo.
Ali Pasha's Mosque
Ali Pasha’s Mosque in Sarajevo is part of the vakuf (endowment) established by Hadim Ali Pasha, who was born in Sarajevo Field. He was raised in Istanbul, where he received his education, and later carried out his service in the Ottoman Army in both Bosnia and Buda. t is presumed that the mosque was built in 1560 or 1561 and it is considered one of the most harmonious and loveliest mosques to be built in the classical Ottoman style in BiH. The courtyard of the mosque contains Ali Pasha’s tomb, as well as the resting places for many other prominent Bosnians. The gravestones for the dervishes, Ajni Dede and Šemsi Dede, were moved to the courtyard, as both men had come to Sarajevo as members of the entourage for Sultan Mehmed II “the Conqueror”. The men were first interred in mausoleums across from the mosque, where the Hygienic Institute is located today. Their gravestones are counted among the oldest monuments from Ottoman Sarajevo.
Havadža Durak Mosque, better known as Baščaršija Mosque, is located on the main square of Sarajevo’s old trading center – Baščaršija. It is not known, exactly, when the mosque was built, but a manuscript from 1528 mentions a neighborhood around Havadža Durak Masjid, so the mosque must have been built before that year. Baščaršija Mosque has one main dome and an open portico which is covered by smaller cupolas, and there’s the adjacent stone minaret. While the courtyard of the mosque is not very large, it’s quite pretty and is like a little oasis in the center of Baščaršija, with its small fountain, roses and two tall poplar trees. The mosque was badly damaged during the last war (1992-1995), after which it underwent major reconstruction. Baščaršija Mosque was named a National Monument of Bosnia and Herzegovina in 2006.
Baščaršijska Džamija
Havadža Durak Mosque, better known as Baščaršija Mosque, is located on the main square of Sarajevo’s old trading center – Baščaršija. It is not known, exactly, when the mosque was built, but a manuscript from 1528 mentions a neighborhood around Havadža Durak Masjid, so the mosque must have been built before that year. Baščaršija Mosque has one main dome and an open portico which is covered by smaller cupolas, and there’s the adjacent stone minaret. While the courtyard of the mosque is not very large, it’s quite pretty and is like a little oasis in the center of Baščaršija, with its small fountain, roses and two tall poplar trees. The mosque was badly damaged during the last war (1992-1995), after which it underwent major reconstruction. Baščaršija Mosque was named a National Monument of Bosnia and Herzegovina in 2006.
Gazi Husrev Bey’s Mosque, or Bey’s Mosque, as it is known locally, was built in the center of Baščaršija in 1530. Bey’s Mosque was designed by Adžem Esir Ali, a Persian from Tabriz, who was the chief architect in the Ottoman Empire at that time. The mosque was built as part of a vakuf (endowment) established by the Ottoman Governor, Gazi Husrev Bey, who governed Bosnia, more or less continuously, from 1521 until his death in 1541. Today, this mosque is rightly seen as the most important architectural monument from the time of Ottoman rule in Bosnia and Herzegovina. There are many Bosnian leaders buried in the mosque’s courtyard, including Reis-ul-Ulema, Mehmed Džemaludin Čaušević; the politician, Dr. Mehmed Spaho; the reformer, Ali Bey Firdus; the poet, Safvet Bey Bašagić....
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Gazi Husrev-beg's Mosque
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Gazi Husrev Bey’s Mosque, or Bey’s Mosque, as it is known locally, was built in the center of Baščaršija in 1530. Bey’s Mosque was designed by Adžem Esir Ali, a Persian from Tabriz, who was the chief architect in the Ottoman Empire at that time. The mosque was built as part of a vakuf (endowment) established by the Ottoman Governor, Gazi Husrev Bey, who governed Bosnia, more or less continuously, from 1521 until his death in 1541. Today, this mosque is rightly seen as the most important architectural monument from the time of Ottoman rule in Bosnia and Herzegovina. There are many Bosnian leaders buried in the mosque’s courtyard, including Reis-ul-Ulema, Mehmed Džemaludin Čaušević; the politician, Dr. Mehmed Spaho; the reformer, Ali Bey Firdus; the poet, Safvet Bey Bašagić....
Neighborhoods
Apartment is based in Historical location of Marijin Dvor. The Sarajevo neighborhood, Marijin Dvor, is home to the city’s most important commercial and administrative buildings, making this part of town the real heart of modern Sarajevo. Marijin Dvor is Sarajevo neighborhood that was named after the palace which was built between today’s four street, Marsala Tita Street, Kralja Tvrtka Street, Augusta Brauna Street and Doline. Today, this palace is national monument of BiH. Austrian entrepreneur August Braun built it and called the palace after his wife Marija, and the building was designed by Czech architect Karel Parik. The building is actually consisted of two parts, Marija’s palace, and August’s palace, so it was built on two occasions: in 1885 and 1895. Marija’s palace was built by the end, while August’s palace remained partially finished, at Kralja Tvrtka Street, from number 10 to number 16. That partially completion of the building took place in 1897. The building Marijin Dvor (Marienhof) is the most significant example of the palace in Sarajevo and it was built in stages, between 1885 and 1899. This building was built as a residential and commercial two-floor house in the form of closed block. After completion of works, at the turn from the IX to XX century, this building was the largest residential building in Sarajevo. Palace were not characteristic for residential construction of the first 20 years of the Austro-Hungarian period. It is assumed that the palace was built as an experimental building, Musterhaus, by industrialist August Braun. All the palace in Sarajevo, with the exception of Marija’s palace, were built only during the secession in the city. Industrialist and large building contractor August Braun, after the construction of the first phase of the palace Marijin Dvor (block towards Titova Street), accepted the ambitious task of making the Regulatory plan of the entire area in 1895. According to the regulation plan, the same contractor, besides the palace Marijin Dvor, built most of the buildings in Kralja Tvrtka Street. However, there is another romantic story about Braun. It is a known fact that Brown was engraving his own initials A B in the brick. After he fell in love with Marija, his future wife, besides his initials, they say, he was engraving hearts in brick as well. With this kind of bricks, Braun built one of the largest and most beautiful buildings in Sarajevo for her, that he named Marija’s Palace (Marijin Dvor), according to which even today that part of the city has the name of Marija: Marijin Dvor.
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Marijin Dvor
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Apartment is based in Historical location of Marijin Dvor. The Sarajevo neighborhood, Marijin Dvor, is home to the city’s most important commercial and administrative buildings, making this part of town the real heart of modern Sarajevo. Marijin Dvor is Sarajevo neighborhood that was named after the palace which was built between today’s four street, Marsala Tita Street, Kralja Tvrtka Street, Augusta Brauna Street and Doline. Today, this palace is national monument of BiH. Austrian entrepreneur August Braun built it and called the palace after his wife Marija, and the building was designed by Czech architect Karel Parik. The building is actually consisted of two parts, Marija’s palace, and August’s palace, so it was built on two occasions: in 1885 and 1895. Marija’s palace was built by the end, while August’s palace remained partially finished, at Kralja Tvrtka Street, from number 10 to number 16. That partially completion of the building took place in 1897. The building Marijin Dvor (Marienhof) is the most significant example of the palace in Sarajevo and it was built in stages, between 1885 and 1899. This building was built as a residential and commercial two-floor house in the form of closed block. After completion of works, at the turn from the IX to XX century, this building was the largest residential building in Sarajevo. Palace were not characteristic for residential construction of the first 20 years of the Austro-Hungarian period. It is assumed that the palace was built as an experimental building, Musterhaus, by industrialist August Braun. All the palace in Sarajevo, with the exception of Marija’s palace, were built only during the secession in the city. Industrialist and large building contractor August Braun, after the construction of the first phase of the palace Marijin Dvor (block towards Titova Street), accepted the ambitious task of making the Regulatory plan of the entire area in 1895. According to the regulation plan, the same contractor, besides the palace Marijin Dvor, built most of the buildings in Kralja Tvrtka Street. However, there is another romantic story about Braun. It is a known fact that Brown was engraving his own initials A B in the brick. After he fell in love with Marija, his future wife, besides his initials, they say, he was engraving hearts in brick as well. With this kind of bricks, Braun built one of the largest and most beautiful buildings in Sarajevo for her, that he named Marija’s Palace (Marijin Dvor), according to which even today that part of the city has the name of Marija: Marijin Dvor.

Consejos para la ciudad

Cómo moverse
Taxi is very affordable (cheap) in Sarajevo.
Using a taxi in Sarajevo is always good option, its very cheap. Maximum price around the city center can cost up to 5 Euro's max. While from airport to city is maximum of 20 Euros, depending on how many people are in the car.
Aduanas y cultura
Bosnian Customs
People of Bosnia and Herzegovina are very sociable and hospitable. Curiosity often makes them overly straight-forward when encountering newcomers. It is culturally appropriate to ask more personal questions such as "Where are you from?", "Are you married?", "Do you have children?", "What do you do for living?" etc. The power of the collective spirit is still omnipresent. People easily open conversations and you can find yourself involved in a lengthy discussion over something you never thought about before (e.g. historical events dating back 2000 years). Humour is always welcome, but it will depend on the person you meet. Humour about marriage, mother-in-laws or politicians is socially acceptable. People of Bosnia and Herzegovina do not pay too much attention to personal space. The means of public transportation are usually overcrowded and probably the best place to see what the meaning of personal space is all about. Too much personal space can be viewed as distrust or an authoritarian way of dealing with people. Eye contact is important and implies honesty and good intentions. Touching is very uncommon when meeting someone for the first time. However, shaking hands with both men and women when greeting the person is customary. Men generally do not touch other men unless they know each other very well, or are relatives. Friends are more likely to hug each other and kiss each other on the cheek (Bosniacs and Croats kiss twice, Serbs three times). Facial expressions are very important and it is customary to have friendly face all the time. There is a proverb "Smile opens a golden gate" that is very appreciated in Bosnia and Herzegovina.
Frases útiles
21 Essential Phrases in Bosnia
Greetings Knowing a few greetings in Bosnian gives you the satisfaction of being different from the other tourists, and the locals appreciate the effort. Dobar dan (DOH-bahr dahn) or Zdravo (ZDRAH-voh) / Hello You’ll hear dobar dan in a formal setting or zdravo among friends. Greet someone you don’t know with a polite dobar dan, and say zdravo to those you do. Hvala (HVAH-lah) / Thank You Everyone around the world appreciates tourists expressing gratitude in the local language. Use hvala in Bosnia. Da (dah) and Ne (neh) / Yes and No Just like other Slavic languages, the ubiquitous word for ‘yes’ is da. The word for ‘no’ in Bosnian shares similarities with other Slavic languages—ne, rather than the Russian nyet. Molim (MOH-leem) / Please If you try to use the local word for ‘please’, you’ll probably get a smile from the person you’re talking to, which tends to be rare in the Bosnian service industry! Dovidenja (doh-vee-JEH-nyah) or Cao (chaoo) / Goodbye The first is formal; most just say cao. Essential Phrases Knowing a few phrases such as asking if someone speaks English or how to find the toilet are two of the most important things you should know. Govorite li engleski? (goh-VOH-ree-teh lee ehn-GLEHS-kee) / Do You Speak English? Don’t assume everyone speaks English. It’s polite to ask in their language rather than in English, which they may not understand. The response may be either yes or da to say they do or a negative ne. Ne Razumijem (neh rah-ZOO-myehm) / I Don’t Understand This one will probably come in useful, especially when you’re first trying to learn the phrases. Gdje je WC? (gdyeh yeh VEH TSEH?) / Where’s the WC? We all need to use the toilet, and you’ll probably rely on this phrase in the bar, restaurant, shopping mall or bus station. Treba mi vasa pomoc (TREH-bah mee VASH-ah POH-mohch) / I Need Your Help It’s always good to know how to ask for help. You never know when you’re going need it. Treba mi doktor (TREH-bah mee DOHK-tohr) / I Need a Doctor Again, always vital, just in case. People in rural areas probably won’t speak English. Pivo (PEE-voh) or Vino (Vee-noh) / Beer or Wine Knowing how to ask for a beer or glass of wine is important too! Public Transport Finding out information on public transport can be a challenge in Bosnia. Online timetables are often outdated and routes change or are cancelled. Your best bet is to learn a few words and phrases to help you get the right information. Either practice the pronunciation or write them down on a piece of paper. Remember, not everyone speaks English outside of Sarajevo and Mostar. Autobus (ow-TOH-boos) / Bus You’ll probably rely on the bus to get around Bosnia. Autobuske stanice? (OW-toh-boos-keh STAH-nee-tseh?) / The Bus Station? Know how to ask for the bus station as well. Voz (vohz) / Train If you do use the train, it can sometimes be difficult to find the station. When you ask a local for the train, he or she may not understand. Instead, use voz. Koji autobus ide Banja Luka? (koy ow-TOH-boos EE-deh…?) / What Bus Goes to Banja Luka? Sometimes it’s easy to find the one you want by looking at the sign in the window. But, the Republika Srpska uses the Cyrillic Alphabet more, and unless you can read the letters, you’re screwed. Koliko je sati? (KOH-lee-koh yeh SAH-tee) / What Time? Pointing to your watch often works, but not every time. Learn how to ask departure times. The ticket officer might point to the schedule or write it down. Knowing this is essential, as the timetable next to the counter could be wrong! Danas (DAH-nahs) / Today It’s always a good idea to double check the timetable. If you want to take the bus today, say danas. Sutra (SOO-trah) / Tomorrow Want to travel tomorrow? Say sutra. Jutro (YOO-troh), Popodne (poh-POHD-neh) and Vece (VEH-cheh) / Morning, Afternoon and Evening Knowing how to say the time of day will also help you find out what time the bus or train is leaving. Numbers Knowing a few numbers is useful for ordering food, drinks, pivo and asking for the time. Learning to count up to ten is usually enough. Nula (NOO-lah) / 0 Jedan (YEH-dahn) / 1 Dva/dvije (dvah/dvyeh) / 2 Tri (tree) / 3 Cetiri (cheh-TEE-ree) / 4 Pet (peht) / 5 Sest (shehst) / 6 Sedam (SEH-dahm) / 7 Osam (OH-sahm) / 8 Devet (DEH-veht) / 9 Deset (DEH-seht) / 10
Aduanas y cultura
Numerous cultural festivals occur every year, such as the Bašćaršija Nights, Sarajevo Winter Festiva
Numerous theatres are present in Sarajevo as well, such as the National Theatre of Sarajevo. The first ever Bosnian opera was held in Sarajevo in 2003. Theatres are also an important part of Sarajevo culture. The first great Sarajevo theatre was the national theatre of Bosnia and Herzegovina, built in 1919 and surviving to this day. Prior to that, plays were often held in parks or at the large houses of wealthy families. Sarajevo also houses the Sarajevo Youth Theatre. Sarajevo also holds many of the most famous historical texts in Bosnia and Herzegovina. They were largely held in the Sarajevo City (and University) Library that was built in 1896. Unfortunately Serbian ultranationalists purposely fired upon the building with incendiary shells. They succeeded in setting the building on fire, and along with it thousands of irreplaceable texts. Today an international effort is underway to replace what was lost. In Ottoman times, the Gazi Husrev-beg library was one of the largest and greatest in the Balkans. Destroyed since, it is currently being rebuilt in a stunning modern form that will house many of the oldest texts found in the city. Sarajevo is home to a number of cultural institutions dedicated to upkeeping the city's culture. The notable Bosniak institute is housed in an impressive building in central Sarajevo, and features various interesting exhibits dealing with the city's and country's culture and history. Also notable are the International Center for Kids and Youth in New Sarajevo and the Center for Sarajevo Culture. The most famous in all of Bosnia and Herzegovina, the National Museum of Bosnia and Herzegovina, is located in central Sarajevo. It was established in 1888, from an idea dating back to the first half of the 19th century. The Sarajevo Haggadah is held there. While in Sarajevo one can also visit the Ars Aevi Museum of Contemporary Art, the Historical Museum of Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Museum of the City of Sarajevo, the War Childhood Museum and the Bosnian and Herzegovinian Museum of Literature. There existed an impressive Olympic museum dedicated to the 84 games, but it was destroyed in warfare. Part of the exhibition has been relocated to a small exhibition hall on the site of the Zetra Stadium. An interesting aspect of the city's culture is its rich musical history. Many regard it as the most musically influential city in the Balkans, especially during the 20th century. "Kad ja pođoh na Benbašu" is a great example of traditional Bosnian music, and it is one of the city's unofficial anthems. The city is home to the Sarajevo Philharmonic Orchestra. During the second half of the 20th century, Sarajevo was a center of Yugoslav pop and rock music. Some of the bands from the Sarajevo school of pop rock, such as Bijelo Dugme and Indeksi, are arguably the greatest Yugoslav rock bands of all time. After them come a wide array of other bands and performers considered "greats" and "legends", such as Crvena Jabuka, Plavi Orkestar, Zabranjeno Pušenje, and others. Solo artists such as Kemal Monteno and Dino Merlin also gained much prominence. Monteno's song, "Sarajevo Ljubavi Moja" (Sarajevo Love of Mine), is another unofficial anthem of Sarajevo. Sarajevo is also the hometown of one of the most significant ex-Yugoslavian alternative industrial-noise bands, SCH. The Sarajevo Film Festival has been held since 1995 and has become the premier film festival in the Balkans. Largely due to its size and the success and popularity of cinema in Bosnia, the event has gained considerable importance and often attracts foreign celebrities. The Sarajevo Winter Festival is also well-known, as are the Bašćaršija Nights, a month-long showcase of local culture, music, and dance. The city is also present internationally in various forms of pop culture. The film "Welcome to Sarajevo" was released in 1997. The Irish rock band U2 had a hit song with Miss Sarajevo, and progressive metal group Savatage's 1995 Concept Album "Dead Winter Dead" deals with the story of Sarajevo's Romeo and Juliet. Sarajevo is also the name of a jam band from East Windsor, New Jersey.