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Lugares emblemáticos en Grecia

Hill
“Being in Athens and not visit Acropolis? No!?! Acropolis is a must. Breathe the clean air and enjoy the view from the ancient rocky hill that Socrates, Plato, Aristotles and many others inspired and shaped logic, founded ideas and gave birth to science. Discover the architecture of Parthenon and the maths behind the construction. Enjoy the tour!”
354recomendaciones de los habitantes
Parque
“You can get a break between visiting historical places of Athens, A lot of high trees to protect you from the sun.”
286recomendaciones de los habitantes
Track Stadium
“The Panathenaic Stadium is a classical cultural and touristic monument of Greece and one of the most significant monuments not only for Athens, but for the whole Greece. It is one of our city’s most popular touristic attractions and one of Athens’ landmarks. Its rich history is directly connected to the Modern Olympic Games as from their revival in 1896 until the Athens Olympic Games in 2004. It is also the place from where the Olympic flame sets up its journey to the cities of the Olympic Games, both Winter, Summer and Youth.”
238recomendaciones de los habitantes
Mosque
“İstanbul's most photogenic building was the grand project of Sultan Ahmet I (r 1603–17), whose tomb is located on the north side of the site facing Sultanahmet Park. The mosque's wonderfully curvaceous exterior features a cascade of domes and six slender minarets. Blue İznik tiles adorn the interior and give the building its unofficial but commonly used name. With the mosque's exterior, the architect, Sedefkâr Mehmet Ağa, managed to orchestrate a visual wham-bam effect similar to that of nearby star Aya Sofya's interior. Its curves are voluptuous; it has six minarets (more than any other mosque at the time it was built); and its courtyard is the biggest of all of the Ottoman mosques. The interior has a similarly grand scale: the İznik tiles number in the tens of thousands; there are 260 windows; and the central prayer space is huge. To best grasp the mosque's design, enter the complex via the Hippodrome rather than from Sultanahmet Park. Once inside the courtyard, which is the same size as the mosque's interior, you'll appreciate the building's perfect proportions. The mosque is such a popular attraction that admission is controlled in order to preserve its sacred atmosphere. Only worshippers are admitted through the main door; visitors must use the south door (follow the signs). The mosque is closed to nonworshippers during the six daily prayer times: two hours before dawn, dawn, midday, afternoon, sunset and right before the last light of the day.”
112recomendaciones de los habitantes
Sitio histórico
“Located on the northwest side of the Acropolis lies Ancient Agora. It is home to various monuments such as Stoa Poikile, Temple of Hephaestus, Mitroo, Tholos, Stoa of Attalos, Vouleftirion and the Altar of the Twelve Gods.”
126recomendaciones de los habitantes
Sitio histórico
“The old watch tower, turned prison, turned museum is the emblem of Thessaloniki.”
97recomendaciones de los habitantes
Sitio histórico
“The colourful and chaotic Grand Bazaar is the heart of İstanbul's Old City and has been so for centuries. Starting as a small vaulted bedesten (warehouse) built by order of Mehmet the Conqueror in 1461, it grew to cover a vast area as lanes between the bedesten, neighbouring shops and hans (caravanserais) were roofed and the market assumed the sprawling, labyrinthine form that it retains today.When here, be sure to peep through doorways to discover hidden hans, veer down narrow lanes to watch artisans at work and wander the main thoroughfares to differentiate treasures from tourist tack. It's obligatory to drink lots of tea, compare price after price and try your hand at the art of bargaining. Allow at least three hours for your visit; some travellers spend three days!”
124recomendaciones de los habitantes
Sitio histórico
“Fortezza By the 16th century, the Ottoman Turks were rapidly advancing into Europe. Between 1573 and 1580, the Venetians built this huge fortress, full of sturdy bastions, to protect the island from the Turkish invasion, but also as a place where locals could flee if the Turks took the city. Perched on the hill of Paleokastro, just west of the old port, it offers spectacular views of the old town of Rethymnon and the sea. At the highest point, note the mosque, originally a church, but it was converted to an Islamic place of worship by the Turks when they finally conquered the city in 1646.There is also a small outdoor theater that hosts summer concerts.”
55recomendaciones de los habitantes
Sitio histórico
“Vividly coloured spices are displayed alongside jewel-like lokum (Turkish delight) at this Ottoman-era marketplace, providing eye candy for the thousands of tourists and locals who make their way here every day. Stalls also sell caviar, dried herbs, honey, nuts and dried fruits. The number of stalls selling tourist trinkets increases annually, yet this remains a great place to stock up on edible souvenirs, share a few jokes with vendors and marvel at the well-preserved building. The market was constructed in the 1660s as part of the New Mosque, with rent from the shops supporting the upkeep of the mosque as well as its charitable activities, which included a school, hamam and hospital. The market's Turkish name, the Mısır Çarşısı (Egyptian Market), references the fact that the building was initially endowed with taxes levied on goods imported from Egypt. In its heyday, the bazaar was the last stop for the camel caravans that travelled the Silk Road from China, India and Persia. On the west side of the market there are outdoor produce stalls selling fresh foodstuff from all over Anatolia, including a wonderful selection of cheeses. Also here is the most famous coffee supplier in İstanbul, Kurukahveci Mehmet Efendi, established over 100 years ago. This is located on the corner of Hasırcılar Caddesi, which is full of shops selling food and kitchenware.”
91recomendaciones de los habitantes
Sitio histórico
“You must visit this amazing historical gem. You can see the Parthenon, sitting atop the Acropolis (“sacred rock”) from all over the city, tempting you to climb up and explore the ruins. No matter how many times you catch a glimpse, it’ll take your breath away. And while it is impressive from a distance, it’s even more amazing up close. Originally built as a fortress, this impressive structure is now the symbol of Athens. Give yourself at least half a day to hike up, explore this masterful creation and its surroundings, enjoy the views from the top, hike back down and grab a bite to eat and explore the Plaka District.”
94recomendaciones de los habitantes
Sitio histórico
“This subterranean structure was commissioned by Emperor Justinian and built in 532. The largest surviving Byzantine cistern in İstanbul, it was constructed using 336 columns, many of which were salvaged from ruined temples and feature fine carved capitals. Its symmetry and sheer grandeur of conception are quite breathtaking, and its cavernous depths make a great retreat on summer days. Like most sites in İstanbul, the cistern has an unusual history. It was originally known as the Basilica Cistern because it lay underneath the Stoa Basilica, one of the great squares on the first hill. Designed to service the Great Palace and surrounding buildings, it was able to store up to 80,000 cu metres of water delivered via 20km of aqueducts from a reservoir near the Black Sea, but was closed when the Byzantine emperors relocated from the Great Palace. Forgotten by the city authorities some time before the Conquest, it wasn't rediscovered until 1545, when scholar Petrus Gyllius was researching Byzantine antiquities in the city and was told by local residents that they were able to obtain water by lowering buckets into a dark space below their basement floors. Some were even catching fish this way. Intrigued, Gyllius explored the neighbourhood and finally accessed the cistern through one of the basements. Even after his discovery, the Ottomans (who referred to the cistern as Yerebatan Saray) didn't treat the so-called Underground Palace with the respect it deserved – it became a dumping ground for all sorts of junk, as well as corpses. The cistern was cleaned and renovated in 1985 by the İstanbul Metropolitan Municipality and opened to the public in 1987. It's now one of the city's most popular tourist attractions. Walking along its raised wooden platforms, you'll feel water dripping from the vaulted ceiling and see schools of ghostly carp patrolling the water – it certainly has bucketloads of atmosphere.”
75recomendaciones de los habitantes
Sitio histórico
“The ancient theater which was built from Herodes in memory of his wife in AD 161. The theater was designed with an auditorium fitted into a natural hollow. Could accommodate nearly 5000 people. The orchestra was located in the center. Live performances are still held at this theater during the summertime!”
101recomendaciones de los habitantes
Sitio histórico
“The Meteora – 4 hours from Athens. This is truly one of the wonders of Greece and is my favorite destination in mainland Greece. Monasteries are perched on the top of mountainous rocks. This an amazing and awe-inspiring sight.”
32recomendaciones de los habitantes
Sitio histórico
“Minoan Palace is easily accesible even with a bus you can take aoutside the property”
54recomendaciones de los habitantes
History Museum
“Built in 306 A.D. by the romans, Rotunda is one of the oldest religious sites of the city. Going back to the late 3rd century A.D., after a number of long devastating wars, the romans decided to divide the Empire into 4 regions, each with its own provinces , thus leading to the creation of a new form of leadership, the Tetrarchy. The administrative needs of the Tetrarchy led Galerius to the construction of the Imperial complex in Thessaloniki because of its importance as one of the capitals, after he came into power being one of the 4 rulers. Galerius Arch (kamara) and Rotunda were basic elements of the palatial complex. Original intensions were predicting its use as a mausoleum, although many archaeologists believe it was initially used as a roman temple. The dimensions of the main structure are quite impressive. Unique mosaics and Roman architecture A central dome (30m high) crowns the structure while the original design was implementing an “Occulus” similar to the one in Pantheon, Rome. A beautifully decorated street, filled with columns was connecting this important cylindrical building to the triumphal Arch in the south. It was turned into a Christian temple around 400 A.D., while decorated at the same time with some wonderful paleo-christian mosaics depicting saints and martyrs. The mosaics that decorate the inside of the building are truly impressive! They have wonderful details and bright colors that surprise most visitors The unusually thick walls of the building reveal the reason rotunda survived a number of devastating earthquakes throughout the centuries. Despite being a Christian temple for 1200 years, it was converted into a mosque in 1590 A.D., during the Ottoman occupation period. Today several discussions are being held regarding its use as a museum, or a church. In December 18, 2015 Rotonda reopened its doors to the public after extended restoration and preservation work, so nowdays everyone will have the chance to enjoy the monument and get a glimpse of its old glory. All around the monument you will discover several places to eat or drink, including coffee shops, little taverns and cozy bars. Because of its location next to the Aristotle University, the place is filled with college students, while the prices are more than reasonable. ”
35recomendaciones de los habitantes
Sitio histórico
“Delphi is one of the most popular and most important archaeological sites in the country, once considered the center of the earth and once the home of the most important ancient Greek oracle.”
19recomendaciones de los habitantes